Wings of the City – El Tiempo

Architecture, Black and White, Texas

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(Time) – This highly detailed figure is incomplete. Despite his fractured body, he spreads his wings in the air and the expression on his face is full of determination. Consider the title of the work. What message does this piece have for you? – from Wings of the City, Self Guided Tour. This piece was exhibited at Fort Worth Water Gardens, overlooking the cascading water down the terraces and steps of the Active Pool and the Texas A&M University School of Law.

El Tiempo-2 El Tiempo-3 El Tiempo-4 El Tiempo-5Photographs @ 2015 Ine Burke | inegaleri.com

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Wings of the City – Alas de México

Architecture, Black and White, Texas

Eight bronze figures created by the internationally acclaimed contemporary sculptor from Mexico, Jorge Marin, are now exhibited in downtown Fort Worth, Texas, until the end of August 2015.  I captured five out of the eight sculptures.  This one is titled “Alas de México” or “Wings of Mexico” and placed at the Sundance Square Plaza. “It encourages interaction by allowing visitors to see, touch and take pictures with the sculpture. Thousands of people around the world have had their portraits taken with the wings.” #ShowyourWingsFW

Alas de Mexico-3“Alas de México” with Tarrant County Courthouse on the background

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 Photographs © 2015 Ine Burke | inegaleri.com

Been to Ennis, Texas?

Architecture, Black and White, Ennis, Historic Site, Old Downtown, Photography

Ennis, Texas, is located just 35 miles southeast of Dallas, Texas. It was established in 1872 and in 1930s used to be known as the place “Where Railroads and Cotton Fields Meet.”  Today it is known, among other things, as the place where Bluebonnet and Czech heritage are celebrated.  The National Polka Festival is held here every Memorial Day Weekend.  Music, costumes, and food of the Czech heritage will be showcased. The parade will run through this historic downtown of Ennis.  Go there this weekend, if you got the chance!

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Firehouse Grill

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More photos:

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Photographs © 2015 Ine Burke | inegaleri.com

The Goode Garden

Edgewood, Historic Site, Nature, Photography, Spring

This is a photo essay of a garden and a house that has been capturing my eyes since I moved to Edgewood.  I finally get to know the owners and have a chance to be there and see it, up close and personal.  It’s the Goode’s Garden.

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The House

Located in the old downtown Edgewood, Texas, this house is known as “Bennett Joseph Carter” Home, built in 1912, adapting Queen Anne-style.  In 2010, it received the Official Historical Medallion from the State of Texas.  It is still in great living condition, owned, lived, and loved by the Goode family.

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Follow the Orange Brick Road

There is an open space between the main house and the garage. Almost all year round, that open space is  filled with burst of vibrant colors from flowers and there’s a glimpse of brown rocks.  I’ve been watching and admiring it for years.

SGoodes 3 |IBurke-1Being there in person, the warm brick walkways will guide one’s vision and way throughout the garden, to the flower beds in front and around the house.  Just follow the orange brick road.

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The backyard is airy and spacious, yet still a lot of things to enjoy.  A swing.  Yellow irises, by the vegetable garden.  Heirloom rose bush grows against the back fence.  Pea blossoms. An outhouse.  The azalea by the house.

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The sound of birds singing and fighting fill the air.  The red-breasted robins catching their dinner.  The deafening sound of the train passing by.

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The side porch provides the premier seats to enjoy the water-feature garden.  Hibiscus. Roses. Dianthus. Viola. Pansies. Azalea. African daisy.  Irises and many more.  Bees and butterflies. The sound of water fountain.

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Finally, there it is.  The part of the garden that I have been wanting to see.

 All photographs © 2015 Ine Burke | inegaleri.com

St. Louis Cemetery No. 1, New Orleans

Architecture, Beyond, Beyond Upper East Texas, Black and White, Fine art photography, Photography, Travel

This is one out of three St. Louis Cemeteries, the oldest surviving cemeteries in New Orleans.  It was established by Royal Spanish Land Grant in 1789.  The St. Louis Cemetery No.1, at the corner of St. Louis and Basin Street, was originally twice its current size and located outside of the city limit. All the graves are above-ground vaults which believed to protect the bodies from flooding and was also a common practice adapted by French and Spanish culture.

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The sky-scraping New Orleans city skyline against down-to-earth tombs of St. Louis Cemetery No.1.

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The cemetery is adorned with fascinating memorial sculptures, monuments, and statuary.Ine Burke | St Louis Cemetery-1

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The tallest monument in the cemetery belongs to The Italian Mutual Benevolent Society.  The tomb has space for a thousand remains for the society members.  It is a way to lower the fund of burial for individuals.

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Some of notable citizens of New Orleans were buried here.  The most visited now is probably what is believed to be the tomb of the Voo Doo Queen, Marie Laveau, who was rested in her family tomb.  The tomb is covered with cross marks put by people who believe that it will make Laveau’s spirit grant a wish. The living family members consider this as vandalism.

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“OMNIA AB UNO” – all comes from One-  is engraved on this pure white 9-feet pyramid tomb belongs to actor Nicolas Cage for his future final resting place. The plot was purchased in 2010.

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The Adams Family tomb (the white one).

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A tomb with different finish.

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Iron works at the cemetery adapt fleur-de-lis and cross elements.

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New Orleans skyline meets the cemetery’s gate.Ine Burke | St Louis Cemetery-16Photographs © 2015 Ine Burke | inegaleri.com

All photograph is available for individual print purchase.

The Streets of French Quarter, New Orleans – Part 1

Architecture, Beyond, Beyond Upper East Texas, Black and White, Photography, Travel

Who doesn’t need a vacation.  A recent trip to the French Quarter, New Orleans, satisfied my ‘appetite’ for street and people photography.

Ine Burke - NOLA PPL-1 Napoleon Building, Chartres and St. Louis St.

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Ine Burke - NOLA PPL-2 B is for “beignet” – Cafe Du Monde, Decatur and St. Ann St.

~Ine Burke - NOLA PPL-3The gate to historic French Market, Ursuline Ave. and N. Peter St.
~Ine Burke - NOLA PPL-4 Between the first and second section of the French Market, a stall keeper blends in with an art installation.

~Ine Burke - NOLA PPL-5“$ Starting artist trying to pace along $” the sign says – Somewhere in French Quarter

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Is it Johny Depp? – Somewhere in French Quarter

~Ine Burke - NOLA PPL-7Royal St.

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Photographs © 2015 Ine Burke | inegaleri.com

Marshall Wonderland of Lights

Architecture, Festivals, Historic Site, Main Street City Texas, Marshall, Old Downtown, Photography, Texas, Travel, Upper East Texas, Winter

light  |līt|
noun
1| the natural agent that stimulates sight and makes things visible

2| an area of something that is brighter or paler than its surroundings

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This is my take on the Marshall Wonderland of Lights Festival, in Marshall, Texas, December 2013.

Marshall Wonderland of Lights

The Historic Harrison County Courthouse, Texas, the center stage of the festival.

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The Courthouse 2

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The Courthouse 3 – taken from the Horse Carriage Ride, from southwest of the Peter Whetstone Square

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The Courthouse viewed from around Peter Whetstone Square – 1

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The Courthouse viewed from around Peter Whetstone Square – 2

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The Courthouse viewed from around Peter Whetstone Square – 3

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The Courthouse viewed from around Peter Whetstone Square – 4

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The Horse Carriage Ride along North Washington Avenue

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The Courthouse viewed from North Washington Avenue and East Austin Street – 1

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The Courthouse viewed from North Washington Avenue and East Austin Street – 2

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Lights from vendor and ticket booths opposite the Telegraph Park -1

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Lights from vendor and ticket booths opposite the Telegraph Park -2

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© Ine Burke 2014

Link to Marshall Wonderland of Lights Festival.

Wills Point Depot Museum

Old Downtown, Photography, Wills Point

Wills Point, Texas.

Wills Point Depot Museum is a historical museum that houses a collection of artifacts, documents, and photos from the city’s old businesses, institutions, households, agricultural and railroad industries. The exhibits are mostly donated by Wills Point residents and the museum is maintained and operated by Wills Point Historical Society. The brick building itself was not the first depot, or train station, that operated in Wills Point. It was built in 1927. The main entrance of the museum leads to what used to be the waiting room.

The main wall in the room is the eye-catcher. It is covered by old business signs that used to flourish in Wills Point and a painting in the middle. Haberdasher, millinery, how often do we hear or see these words nowadays? Look closely and notice that those are actually painted on one piece of huge cloth that used to be the theatre backdrop in the 1926 Majestic Theatre across the railroad. What used to be the depot’s restroom area on the east side, now hosts artifacts from Wills Point schools. The original ticket-selling booth and depot’s office on the west side, holds various memorabilia such as old cashier machines, typewriters, and many more. In the further west rooms, agricultural and medical artifacts are exhibited. Pictures from the old “golden days” are displayed in the Pictorial Room. Centennial Quilts, vintage clothes, and turn of the century furniture, are the main attraction in the Quilt Room.

The museum is currently open by appointment only. It is located at 210 W. South Commerce St (on US HWY 80), Wills Point, Texas 75169. For enquiry and appointment call Pat Mitchell, (903) 873-4568.

For those who like to flick through history of the city and the county, several copies of Van Zandt County Genealogy Publications and 1954 Wills Point Chronicle (hardbound) are available for browsing at the museum. Or, travel two blocks north from the Depot Museum to West High Street, between 5th and 4th Streets, to gain Wills Point’s history in a glance through six panels of wall murals. These murals were lovingly and painstakingly created with inputs from a number of citizens and painted by a local artist, Dan Fogel.

Photos © Ine Burke / Inegaleri 2013

Published in County Line Magazine July/August 2013 issue.

My Northeast Texas

Black and White, MySpread
Photos in the book, My Northeast Texas

Photos in the book, My Northeast Texas

Initially, there was a simple plan: pairing photographs. The photographs were taken in random places, during random journeys of running random errands, random events, and of random subjects. The intent was to intuitively pair this randomness based on visual cues, not by specific chronology or place.

The order it somewhat follows is the geography of where these photographs were captured. Texas. Well, a little tiny corner of this gargantuan state, to be exact. The corner some call North Texas, Northeast Texas, East Texas, or Upper East Side of Texas. No matter which it is called, my Texas centers at the intersection between two important highways, US Highway 80 and Texas Highway 19, in the city called Edgewood, in Van Zandt County.

It’s an ordinary place, at first sight. Just two highways slicing through small towns, pastures, ranches, quiet communities, bumpy county roads. Trains towing industrial cars. There is no grand canyon or enormous rock monuments. No wide rivers with magnificent old steel bridges. There are no bustling boulevards, nor arrondissement. No modern architectural marvels. No central park dotted with art installations.

Nevertheless, I take a great deal of photographs. Random subjects, random places. I just did that out of the love of the work itself, intriguing subjects, and curiosity. Then, the curiousity started to make things became a little bit more complicated. I started wondering how certain subjects or places came into being. When, how, and why did they all start, end, or change.

So, I did some reading and research on the history of my photographic subjects, and discovered many interesting tales from bygone days. It took me wandering from century to century, to places which no longer exist, and to events that shaped the communities today. I started to better understand the subjects in my photographs and developed a deeper respect for the places and people. It helped me to see beyond the ordinary. The initial intent was not to write a history book. Historical background or facts presented -also randomly- in the book are there just to help illuminate the subjects or the places.

In pairing this randomness, two by two, spread by spread, I see things and matters that embody Texas and Texans. At least, for now it is my own view on this little corner of Texas.
My Northeast Texas.

I also found some subjects are so independent, eloquent, and almost too arrogant to be paired. So I left them alone.

I just want to keep it simple. Simple with knowledge.

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Preview the entire book at this link:
My Northeast Texas

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The book is available for preview and sale at:

(1) Edgewood Heritage Park Office and Gift Shop, downtown Edgewood, Texas – (903) 896-4448 or 4358 – Open Thu-Sat, 9am-2pm

(2) The Lumberyard Cafe, 809 E. Pine Street (HWY 80), Edgewood, Texas – (903) 896-7766 – PREVIEW ONLY

(3) Nutty’s Peanut Butter Store, 233 N Main Street, Grand Saline, TX 75140 – 1-877-NUTTYSPB – www.nuttyspeanutbutter.com

(4) Means Home Centre, 1912 W. Frank Street (HWY80), Grand Saline, Texas – (903) 962-3861

(5) All Through The House, Antique/Gifts/Home Decor, 410 E. Lennon (HWY 69 East), Emory, Texas 75440 – (903) 474-9150

(6) Online at my online store (CLICK HERE)

Sale price: $40 (tax included) + Shipping for online purchase

Reviewed in March 2013 County Line Magazine and Rains County Leader (Click here)

Emory Heritage Park

Architecture, Emory, Heritage Park, My Graphic Work, MySpread, Upper East Texas

STEP BACK IN TIME TO 1900’s RAINS COUNTY, TEXAS

Earlier in the month I have the honor of exploring and taking photographs of the Emory Heritage Park, in Emory, Rains County, Texas. I first contacted Ms. Keeley Roan, the Director of Community Development of The City of Emory Development Corporation and she organized the meeting. On the beautiful day of shooting, I and my ‘troop’ (my husband and 1.5 year old daughter) were greeted by the President of Rains County Historical Society, Mr. A.B. Godwin, and his wife who is also a member of the historical society, Mrs. Loretta Godwin; Rains County Judge, Mr. Wayne Wolfe; and Ms. Keeley Roan herself. Mr. Godwin led us first to The Luckett House. When he opened up the front door and ushered us into the house the feeling of stepping back in the era of 1900’s rushing in. And that was just the start.

See, learn, and experience The Emory Heritage Park yourself through my pictures, presented with some background information. And if you are interested in visiting the park, the next event will be “Back to School Bash”, August 4th, 2012. All buildings / structures will be opened for public.

For more information, contact: Ms. Keeley Roan, Director of Community Development of The City of Emory Development Corporation, 903-473-2465 x 112, email: keeley@emorytx.com, website: www.emorytx.com.

Read the article in County Line Magazine‘s August 2012 issue.

Mr. A.B. Godwin & Mrs. Loretta Godwin from Rains County Historical Society, Mr. Wayne Wolfe -Rains County Judge, and Ms. Keeley Roan -Director of Community Development of The City of Emory Development Corporation.

The Gallery View