The Goode Garden

Edgewood, Historic Site, Nature, Photography, Spring

This is a photo essay of a garden and a house that has been capturing my eyes since I moved to Edgewood.  I finally get to know the owners and have a chance to be there and see it, up close and personal.  It’s the Goode’s Garden.

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The House

Located in the old downtown Edgewood, Texas, this house is known as “Bennett Joseph Carter” Home, built in 1912, adapting Queen Anne-style.  In 2010, it received the Official Historical Medallion from the State of Texas.  It is still in great living condition, owned, lived, and loved by the Goode family.

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Follow the Orange Brick Road

There is an open space between the main house and the garage. Almost all year round, that open space is  filled with burst of vibrant colors from flowers and there’s a glimpse of brown rocks.  I’ve been watching and admiring it for years.

SGoodes 3 |IBurke-1Being there in person, the warm brick walkways will guide one’s vision and way throughout the garden, to the flower beds in front and around the house.  Just follow the orange brick road.

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The backyard is airy and spacious, yet still a lot of things to enjoy.  A swing.  Yellow irises, by the vegetable garden.  Heirloom rose bush grows against the back fence.  Pea blossoms. An outhouse.  The azalea by the house.

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The sound of birds singing and fighting fill the air.  The red-breasted robins catching their dinner.  The deafening sound of the train passing by.

SGoodes 2 |IBurke-10

SGoodes 2 |IBurke-9

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The side porch provides the premier seats to enjoy the water-feature garden.  Hibiscus. Roses. Dianthus. Viola. Pansies. Azalea. African daisy.  Irises and many more.  Bees and butterflies. The sound of water fountain.

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Finally, there it is.  The part of the garden that I have been wanting to see.

 All photographs © 2015 Ine Burke | inegaleri.com

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Either Side of the Bridge

Black and White, Edgewood, Fruitvale, Nature, Photography, Upper East Texas, Winter

Standing on the 2-year-old concrete bridge, these are what you will see in winter.  Tangled vines, limbs, and branches. And barren trees. The bridge is one of many that crosses over the Mill Creek in Van Zandt County, Tx.  This particular one is connecting Edgewood and Fruitvale.

BW CR by Ine Burke 2015-1

Fruitvale < | > Edgewood

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BW CR by Ine Burke 2015-2Edgewood < | > Fruitvale

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BW CR by Ine Burke 2015-4From the bridge, the county road meanders towards Hwy 19, Edgewood

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Photographs © 2015 Ine Burke | inegaleri.com

Winter on the Edge of the Piney Woods

Countryscape, Edgewood, Nature, Photography, Upper East Texas, Winter

A triptych (3 panels) approach is used to present this common scenery of branches and limbs in a winter in East Texas. Old wet plate and eroded film look were applied.  Just another play on “On the Edge of the Piney Woods” photo series.On the Edge of the Piney Woods Triptych© 2015 Ine Burke | inegaleri.com

Fiery Sunrise on the Edge of the Piney Woods

Countryscape, Edgewood, Nature, Photography, Skyscape, Upper East Texas, Winter

I’ve been observing and preserving the beauty of East Texas sky since I moved here, in Edgewood, in 2006. In 2012, I self-published my photography book, On the Edge of the Piney Woods, compiling the photographs of ever-changing Texas sky and the land’s natural beauty in four seasons. The sky and the land don’t stop amaze me with their ever-changing beauty and surprises, so I keep taking photographs of the same subjects. Like these views of one fiery sunrise in early winter in December 2013. The ray of golden sunlight caught my eyes through the kitchen window, as always, notifying me that a glorious scene was going to play out there in a few seconds. Without delay, I grabbed my camera and got out there in a crisp morning to capture it.

SKY-Sunrise December 2013-1 SKY-Sunrise December 2013-2 SKY-Sunrise December 2013-3

© Ine Burke 2014 / inegaleri.com 2014

Blurb Preview of the book, On the Edge of the Piney Woods:

Edgewood Homecoming Parade 2013

Edgewood, Fall, Festivals, Old Downtown, Photography

homecoming |ˈhōmˌkəmiNG|
noun
an instance of returning home.
• a high school, college, or university game, dance, or other event to which alumni are invited.

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parade |pəˈrād|
noun
a public procession, esp. one celebrating a special day or event and including marching bands and floats.

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bulldog |ˈbo͝olˌdôg|
noun
a dog of a sturdy smooth-haired breed with a large head and powerful protruding lower jaw, a flat wrinkled face, and a broad chest.
bulldog
• a person noted for courageous or stubborn tenacity: [ as modifier ] : the bulldog spirit.

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garter |ˈgärtər|
noun
1) a band worn around the leg to keep up a stocking or sock.
• a band worn on the arm to keep a shirtsleeve up.
• a suspender for a sock or stocking.
2) ( the Garter ) short for Order of the Garter.
• the badge or membership of this order

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Edgewood, October 18th, 2013

The Dancing Trees – A new book by Ine Burke & Harold Burke

Edgewood, My Graphic Work, MySpread, Photography

THE DANCING TREES

Photographs & Words

A new book by Ine Burke & Harold Burke

To be released on November 9th, 2013, at the 37th Edgewood Heritage Festival.

TDT Cover 2013

THE DANCING TREES
Photographs and Words

Photographs by Ine Burke
The Dancing Trees brings together nine photo essays capturing objects normally seen, and some unexpectedly found, in a rural farmstead and in old downtown Edgewood, Texas. It’s simply about the things that we treasure and respect. Care and love. Discover and research. Or just the things that we enjoy doing.

~ Ine Burke

Words by Harold Burke
The words are inspired by Ine’s beautiful photographs, and by our simple life on the farm in East Texas with our wonderful daughter, Alafair. And our dog, Hank.

~ Harold Burke

Book description
Hardbound Case / 8”x10” / 94 Pages / 9 Chapters /
68 Color and Black-and-White Photographs / 22 Poems

November 2013

Edgewood, Texas

Contents
About
List of Photographs and Words
Chapter I: Artifacts
Chapter II: The Barnyard
Chapter III: Edgewood
Chapter IV: The Garden
Chapter V: Horses
Chapter VI: Hunting
Chapter VII: The Dancing Trees
Chapter VIII: Patterns in Nature
Chapter IX: Alafair

Preview

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Discover 300 Years of History in 35 Miles in Van Zandt County, Texas

Edgewood, Fruitvale, Grand Saline, Historic Parkway, Historic Site, MySpread, Texas, Travel, Upper East Texas, Wills Point

SELF-GUIDED TOUR OF THE DALLAS-SHREVEPORT HISTORIC PARKWAY IN VAN ZANDT COUNTY

BY INE BURKE for the County Line Magazine October 2012

The early native American Caddo established a trail from the Red River in Louisiana, as far west as the Pecos River to trade with the Jumano who inhabited West Texas. The trail later evolved into main route from the river port in Shreveport to North Texas. Now, historical societies in North Texas are working to research and preserve this historic road. In Van Zandt County, the work has been done by The Old Dallas – Shreveport Preservation Association, established in 1993, whose committees are also members of the county historical societies. Being the most advanced in the effort among other counties, the committee has put up road signs and historical markers along the path, enabling people to do a self-guided tour and discover at least 300 years of history along the 35-mile section of this county’s historical route.

The Old Dallas-Shreveport Road’s existence shaped the towns and communities in northeast Texas. The Texas and Pacific Railway was laid parallel to the Old Dallas-Shreveport Road about a mile northward in 1873. US Highway 80 was established later. It is also laid parallel to the historic road and was initially known as the “Dixie Overland Trail” in 1914. Its name became TX15 in 1919 and later US80 in 1926. The arrival of the railway and US80 ended the era of the Old Dallas-Shreveport Road as a major thoroughfare. See the history timeline of the old road at the end of this article.

THE TOUR

The Dallas-Shreveport Road Historic Parkway, Van Zandt County, Tx

Dallas-Shreveport Historic Parkway in Van Zandt County, Texas

Tour this historical parkway eastward point by point from Wills Point to Sand Flat in Van Zandt County, Texas.

1. The tour starts at the junction of HWY64 and CR3415 in Wills Point, just south of US80. The founders of Wills Point first settled here in 1847 and the County Seat War took place in 1877 along this part of the Dallas-Shreveport Road.

2. About 4 miles from Point 1 – New Hope Cemetery. A veteran of the Texas war for independence from Mexico, set aside some acres to encourage settlement around 1871. He and four confederate soldiers are among those who were buried here.

3. FM1504 and CR3215. A cotton gin is believed to have been located near this crossroads. About 450 yards from the intersection, where the road bends right, a freight company stop used to operate in the mid 1800’s.

4. From CR3215 to CR3216, 300 yards on left. Slaughter School, built in 1888, fulfilled the need for a school due to the population growth along the road. It was later consolidated with the Edgewood school district. Go back to CR3215.

5. Barren Ridge. Continue to CR3218, cross FM859 to CR3118, turn right to CR3105, pass CR3109. This is where the Black Land Prairie meets the Post Oak Savannah, thus name ‘Edgewood’. Barren Ridge used to be a savannah. The cultivation brought by the settlers is the reason why the trees are there now. A post office and stage stop was once located here from 1850 to 1857. The citizens of Canton once traveled 8 miles here for their mail.

Crooked Creek, Van Zandt County, Tx

Between Point 5-6: Crooked Creek, Van Zandt County, Tx

Between 5-6. Continue through a grove where the canopy of trees thickens. Sunken trails on either side of the road were the original Dallas-Shreveport road bed. From an unguarded wooden bridge, the steep Crooked Creek’s bank is noticeable. Where the road bends right, the original trail bends away into private lands towards Point 7.

6. A mile from the bridge, stands a tree that grows almost in the middle of the road. Back in the 1800’s, surveyors often used a tree on the land they surveyed as the benchmark, and called this tree the witness tree. This is one of them.

7. To TX19 and go north. The location of Point 7 is on private property, approximately across CR3108, on right. It’s a crossing with deep vertical banks near Mill Creek, and is part of the old Caddo trail. The early pioneers who traveled this road called it Devil’s Gap due to raids by Kiowa and other native American tribes who used this part of the trail as an attack point. Stop at the Mill Creek bridge (past Point 8), to visualize the condition.

8. From TX19 turn right to CR1117. About 0.5 miles down the road, on the left across from a private mailbox, there’s a steel sign post, where Father Jose Calahorra Historical Marker once was. The marker was stolen after its dedication in 2009. It is such a shame, considering that it’s the oldest historical facts found so far related to this part of the road. This is where the Caddo trail intersected Tawakoni trail that went from the Sabine River in the north to Nacogdoches in the south. The entourage of Father Jose Calahorra, a well-respected Spanish missionary in Texas, was greeted here and then escorted by the Tawakoni to their village on the Sabine River in 1760, 1761, and 1764.

9. Cherokee Survey Line, dated 1841, crosses the CR1117 1 mile down the road from Point 8.

10. About 4.5 miles from Point 8, on CR1817, on left. An effort to colonize an area of North Central Texas and settle 500 families in 5 years was led by Charles Mercer in 1844. The boundaries were Palestine and Waco on the south, the Brazos River on the west, McKinney area on the north, and this point on the east. Descendants of Mercer’s colony settlers still reside in Texas.

Point 8: Father Jose Calahorra Historical Marker Dedication

Point 8: Father Jose Calahorra Historical Marker Dedication

11. Turn right to CR1818. The marker is in the Creagleville Cemetery. The Dallas-Shreveport Road went through Creagleville, a community named after Henry Creagle, a German native who settled in Van Zandt County in 1847.The agricultural community once had a school, church, cotton gin, gristmill, and cemetery. Only the cemetery remains today.

12. Straight ahead to CR1820, to the intersection with CR1824, on left. During the Civil War, people from the southeast fled west and formed a community here around 1863, on land where the property owners were away at war. Poles were used to build homes, thus Poletown. After the war, arrangements were made for them to purchase land or become tenant farmers. Jacob C. Rhodes’ land in Poletown was designated as a new town, Rhodesburg, in 1895. Rhodes was a member of the Populist Party, who then changed to and organized the Socialist Party of Texas. For over a decade the town accommodated the Socialist Party’s movement.

13. Continue to CR1823/W Patterson St. Take a glance at Morton Salt Company Lake, on right, a private man-made lake built by B.W. Carrington & Company in 1911 for the salt plant use.

14. Continue east on Hwy17 to the meeting point with Hwy110. The original road goes straight through private lands and picks up again at Point 18.Take left on Hwy110/FM17.  An old cotton gin sits on the left. Continue through historic downtown Grand Saline to the intersection with US80.

15. Across the junction of Hwy110/FM17 and US80, on left – The Salt Palace is a tiny building made of pure salt that has been rebuilt three times since its debut in 1936 due to deterioration caused by weather. Inside, it exhibits the salt industry and history of Grand Saline. Wiley H. Post, one of world’s greatest pioneer aviators who is a native son of Van Zandt County, is also remembered here.

Point 14: 1890 Coton Gin, Grand Saline, Tx

Point 14: 1890 Coton Gin, Grand Saline, Tx

16. Continue 0.5 mile east on US80, take right to FM857. Kleer Park is located on the left. During the Civil War, the demand for salt increased significantly to preserve food and hides. Salt workers were exempted from army service. The salt mine in Grand Saline was once named Kleer Mine. It was operated by the Confederacy during the war.

17. Salt Flat, Marsh, and Birds Sanctuary on FM857, by the first concrete bridge. Take a peek at the white surface of one of the largest and purest salt domes in the country. Its depth is unknown and its supply of the valuable mineral is estimated to last 20,000 years. The Cherokee were the first to obtain salt from here in the early 1800’s. It is now designated as a bird sanctuary.

18. Jordan’s Saline and the site of the first courthouse, by the second bridge, across CR1701. It’s the oldest community in Van Zandt County, established by John Jordan in 1844, even before the county was formed in 1848. It was once the County Seat before being moved to Canton in 1850. By 1860 it had a thriving salt industry. The community diminished after the railroad arrived in 1873 and the townsite was relocated one mile north and named Grand Saline.

19. Continue 2.8 miles, to the junction of FM1255 (Crockett’s Bluff Road) and FM857, on Sand Flat Cemetery property. It’s a small community that sprung up along the historic road in the 1850’s. It was first known as Chrestman, then Sand Flat, and later “Fulton” when a post office was in operation from 1900-1905. The community retained the name Sand Flat.

20. Continue on FM 857 to Providence, another community that grew along the road in the 1850’s. It’s the eastern end of the historic parkway in Van Zandt County. Providence Cemetery, established in 1873, is just past the Smith County line. Spanish explorer, Pedro Vial may have used part of this road in 1788. End of the tour. Continue to the intersection with FM1253, go north 3.4 miles to get to US80.

Beyond Van Zandt County to the east, the route resumes about 3.5 miles south on FM1253 from Providence, take CR452 on left. From Wills Point to the west, the route goes northwest towards Rockwall, then to downtown Dallas (Bird’s Fort by Trinity River) – also recognized as the historical Central National Road of the Republic of Texas; then to Arlington and end at Fort Worth. Dallas was actually built on the old Caddo trade trail. ~

The article was published in the County Line Magazine: http://www.countylinemagazine.com/October-2012/Discover-300/

History Timeline of the Dallas - Shreveport Road

History Timeline of the Dallas – Shreveport Road

37th Edgewood Heritage Festival, Van Zandt County, Texas

Edgewood, Festivals, My Graphic Work, MySpread
e-Advertisement in County Line eMagazine

e-Advertisement in County Line eMagazine

I have given the honor by the Edgewood Historical Society to design the artwork for the 37th Edgewood Heritage Festival this year. A sketch of The 1927 Myrtle Spring School done by a talented local artist, Paige Bridges, is used as the main focus. The picture of the two kids holding hands were taken during 2009 festival. They were getting ready for a street dance performance together with their peers from the local school during this fun event.

The festival celebrates the legacy, traditions, and customs of rural life in East Texas around late 1800s and early 1900s. What makes this festival very special and worth visiting is that the event is held in the Heritage Park Museum of East Texas that houses about 21 authentically restored and furnished historical buildings depicting a rural village in Van Zandt County in its early development. The buildings are well maintained and furnished, the ground beautifully manicured. All the buildings will be opened for tours with docents ready to tell the visitors the history of each one.

Special vintage craft demonstration are always a big part of the heritage festival. The East Texas Blacksmith Association will operate the old blacksmith shop in the village and many will bring their vintage anvils to show off their skills. The antique printing presses will be running in the restored print shop and the making of lye soap at the log smoke house will be popular spots. The restored train depot will be the destination of model train enthusiast as an extensive exhibit of trains will be operating in the freight room. A Knife and Tomahawk Throwers group will make their debut in this festival this year and demonstrate their skill and may let the visitors experience it, too.

A talent show on the main stage will offer a variety of entertainment while a dog show around the gazebo in the log village and -for the first time this yea- a DOG PARADE, will be a highlight for canine lovers. The 20th Pinto Bean Cook-off is on tap and competent beaners offer their best talents in preparing this Van Zandt County gourmet treat. These contests feature prizes to be awarded.

In addition to the popular Classic Car Show on the streets of downtown Edgewood, the third annual antique Tractor Show will attract collectors from a wide area. Each of these shows award many prizes to the participants. The Heritage Quilt Show will take place in the Edgewood Civic Center from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

One of the highlights of the day will be Sparky Sparks, “The King of Armadillo Racing”, and his famous Texas Armadillos. This must-see event will begin around 10 a.m. and will end with a ‘celebrity’ race featuring three of Van Zandt County’s well-known citizens.

Vendors Ally offers the visitors a shopping spree to remember. There will be a children’s playground area with rides, a food court featuring a variety of culinary treats and the Heritage Bake Sale will be held in the restored Gilliam Gas Station.

The festival is possible through many generous sponsors throughout the area. Net proceeds from the festival go to the future development and maintenance of Heritage Park Museum of East Texas.

Mark your calendar for the 37th Edgewood Heritage Festival:

Saturday, November 9th, 2013, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission is free. Live acoustic music will be offered throughout the day.

At the Heritage Park Museum of East Texas, downtown Edgewood, Texas (50 miles east of Dallas, 50 miles west of Tyler, on US Hwy 80)

To view the festival’s pictures go to my previous posts:

https://inegaleri.com/2012/05/04/edgewood-heritage-festival-heritage-park/

https://inegaleri.com/2012/05/04/edgewood-heritage-festival-downtown/

The event information can also be found at:

http://www.countylinemagazine.com/Things-To-Do-In-The-Upper-East-Side-Of-Texas/index.php/name/37th-Edgewood-Heritage-Festival/event/9896/

Wills Point Depot Museum

Old Downtown, Photography, Wills Point

Wills Point, Texas.

Wills Point Depot Museum is a historical museum that houses a collection of artifacts, documents, and photos from the city’s old businesses, institutions, households, agricultural and railroad industries. The exhibits are mostly donated by Wills Point residents and the museum is maintained and operated by Wills Point Historical Society. The brick building itself was not the first depot, or train station, that operated in Wills Point. It was built in 1927. The main entrance of the museum leads to what used to be the waiting room.

The main wall in the room is the eye-catcher. It is covered by old business signs that used to flourish in Wills Point and a painting in the middle. Haberdasher, millinery, how often do we hear or see these words nowadays? Look closely and notice that those are actually painted on one piece of huge cloth that used to be the theatre backdrop in the 1926 Majestic Theatre across the railroad. What used to be the depot’s restroom area on the east side, now hosts artifacts from Wills Point schools. The original ticket-selling booth and depot’s office on the west side, holds various memorabilia such as old cashier machines, typewriters, and many more. In the further west rooms, agricultural and medical artifacts are exhibited. Pictures from the old “golden days” are displayed in the Pictorial Room. Centennial Quilts, vintage clothes, and turn of the century furniture, are the main attraction in the Quilt Room.

The museum is currently open by appointment only. It is located at 210 W. South Commerce St (on US HWY 80), Wills Point, Texas 75169. For enquiry and appointment call Pat Mitchell, (903) 873-4568.

For those who like to flick through history of the city and the county, several copies of Van Zandt County Genealogy Publications and 1954 Wills Point Chronicle (hardbound) are available for browsing at the museum. Or, travel two blocks north from the Depot Museum to West High Street, between 5th and 4th Streets, to gain Wills Point’s history in a glance through six panels of wall murals. These murals were lovingly and painstakingly created with inputs from a number of citizens and painted by a local artist, Dan Fogel.

Photos © Ine Burke / Inegaleri 2013

Published in County Line Magazine July/August 2013 issue.

Chimney Swifts’ Maneuver against Majestic Texas Sky

Edgewood, Nature, Photography, Skyscape, Summer

It was the first sunset in July.

Chimney swifts maneuvering against the majestic Texas sky before settling down back in the chimney for the night.

ChimneySwifts-IneBurke-1 ChimneySwifts-IneBurke-2 ChimneySwifts-IneBurke-3 ChimneySwifts-IneBurke-4 ChimneySwifts-IneBurke-5 ChimneySwifts-IneBurke-6 ChimneySwifts-IneBurke-7Photographs © Ine Burke / Inegaleri 2013

See more Texas sky photos in my book: On the Edge of the Piney Woods

My Northeast Texas

Black and White, MySpread
Photos in the book, My Northeast Texas

Photos in the book, My Northeast Texas

Initially, there was a simple plan: pairing photographs. The photographs were taken in random places, during random journeys of running random errands, random events, and of random subjects. The intent was to intuitively pair this randomness based on visual cues, not by specific chronology or place.

The order it somewhat follows is the geography of where these photographs were captured. Texas. Well, a little tiny corner of this gargantuan state, to be exact. The corner some call North Texas, Northeast Texas, East Texas, or Upper East Side of Texas. No matter which it is called, my Texas centers at the intersection between two important highways, US Highway 80 and Texas Highway 19, in the city called Edgewood, in Van Zandt County.

It’s an ordinary place, at first sight. Just two highways slicing through small towns, pastures, ranches, quiet communities, bumpy county roads. Trains towing industrial cars. There is no grand canyon or enormous rock monuments. No wide rivers with magnificent old steel bridges. There are no bustling boulevards, nor arrondissement. No modern architectural marvels. No central park dotted with art installations.

Nevertheless, I take a great deal of photographs. Random subjects, random places. I just did that out of the love of the work itself, intriguing subjects, and curiosity. Then, the curiousity started to make things became a little bit more complicated. I started wondering how certain subjects or places came into being. When, how, and why did they all start, end, or change.

So, I did some reading and research on the history of my photographic subjects, and discovered many interesting tales from bygone days. It took me wandering from century to century, to places which no longer exist, and to events that shaped the communities today. I started to better understand the subjects in my photographs and developed a deeper respect for the places and people. It helped me to see beyond the ordinary. The initial intent was not to write a history book. Historical background or facts presented -also randomly- in the book are there just to help illuminate the subjects or the places.

In pairing this randomness, two by two, spread by spread, I see things and matters that embody Texas and Texans. At least, for now it is my own view on this little corner of Texas.
My Northeast Texas.

I also found some subjects are so independent, eloquent, and almost too arrogant to be paired. So I left them alone.

I just want to keep it simple. Simple with knowledge.

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Preview the entire book at this link:
My Northeast Texas

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The book is available for preview and sale at:

(1) Edgewood Heritage Park Office and Gift Shop, downtown Edgewood, Texas – (903) 896-4448 or 4358 – Open Thu-Sat, 9am-2pm

(2) The Lumberyard Cafe, 809 E. Pine Street (HWY 80), Edgewood, Texas – (903) 896-7766 – PREVIEW ONLY

(3) Nutty’s Peanut Butter Store, 233 N Main Street, Grand Saline, TX 75140 – 1-877-NUTTYSPB – www.nuttyspeanutbutter.com

(4) Means Home Centre, 1912 W. Frank Street (HWY80), Grand Saline, Texas – (903) 962-3861

(5) All Through The House, Antique/Gifts/Home Decor, 410 E. Lennon (HWY 69 East), Emory, Texas 75440 – (903) 474-9150

(6) Online at my online store (CLICK HERE)

Sale price: $40 (tax included) + Shipping for online purchase

Reviewed in March 2013 County Line Magazine and Rains County Leader (Click here)

The 82nd Athens Old Fiddlers Reunion 2013

Athens, Festivals, Old Downtown, Photography, Spring, Upper East Texas

June 1st, 2013 – Athens, Texas

The state’s longest running contest was held at the square of old downtown Athens, Texas, on the last day of May and first day of June, this year.

I don’t know enough about fiddlers and fiddling, but I can feel the old Texas atmosphere around the square by listening to the tunes played and sung.

The tunes date back older than the reunion itself, I heard.

Young and seniors fiddled in harmony. Ladies played bingo. Spouse guarded the instruments. Toddler watched in the shade of a big ol’ oak tree.

The youth, 18 years and under, practiced, waited, watched, competed.

Concession booths stood by.

Apple Blossom. Brilliancy.

The spectators swayed.

Kids played puddle. Teens wandered around.

© Photographs by Ine Burke / Inegaleri.com 2013

Stroll along a Texas Main Street City: Mineola

Architecture, Historic Site, Main Street City Texas, Mineola, Old Downtown, Upper East Texas

Mineola, which site is located at the center of East Texas timber belt, is a town that sprung up in 1873 with the construction of the southern transcontinental railroad. The train station in Mineola today is a designated daily stop, served by the national railroad passenger system’s Amtrak Texas Eagle which connects Chicago (Illinois), St. Louis (Missouri), and Los Angeles (California). Mineola is a Texas and National Main Street City. Its historic downtown has been revitalized and holds many attractive community events all year round. An acoustic music jam is held every third Saturday by the railroad, along the streets and in the alleys downtown.

These photos are taken from S Johnson Street and Commerce Street, Mineola, Texas. May 2013.

Photographs ©INEGALERI.COM 2013

All American Affair

Black and White, Canton, Festivals, Photography, Upper East Texas

It’s an American affair. Classic American car show, American food vendor, and American band performance. All in one event in Canton, Texas, last weekend.

Photographs ©INEGALERI.COM 2013

Life Festival organized by Driven Life Church, at the First Monday Ground, Canton, Texas. I was informed that the band is Covey Thedford and the Broken Soul.

 

County Line Magazine on the other Side of the World – by Ine Burke

Beyond, Beyond Upper East Texas, My Graphic Work, MySpread, Travel, Upper East Texas
CLM in INDONESIA 1

County Line Magazine in Indonesia – Page 1/3

CLM in Indonesia 2

County Line Magazine in Indonesia – Page 2/3

County Line Magazine in Indonesia - Page 3/3

County Line Magazine in Indonesia – Page 3/3

Flying Fish Gallery

Ben Wheeler, Old Downtown, Photography, Travel

Flying Fish Gallery, an art gallery nestled in the heart of revitalized old downtown Ben Wheeler, Texas, is operated by husband and wife, Randy and Sherri Martin. The art pieces shown and sold here, are created by artists who lives around the area, including Randy and Sherri’s. Sherri repurposes objects made of metal, wood, or sometimes paper, she found in a flea market, garage sale, or estate sale. She would work with an object by observing it first until she sees a new object comes out of it. Then she would start dismantling, combining, and adding elements to it and go toward where her initial instinct told her to go. For Sherri, animal is the object she loves to make. Randy’s artwork are also shaped by used metal comes from old farm implements or other industrial material. His artworks are displayed outdoor, some mobile, as garden ornaments. Take a peek of Sherri and Randy’s work and gallery through my photos below. The whole art gallery is an art by itself. It’s welcoming, warm, bright, but tranquil at the same time. Sherri Martin was featured in the County Line Magazine in June 2012. Click here to read the coverage. The Flying Fish Gallery is located at downtown Ben Wheeler, along FM279 Artisan Trail, connecting Ben Wheeler and Edom, Texas, off Hwy 64.

I have the honor to be one of the artists whose work is made available for sale through Flying Fish Gallery. My second photography book, My Northeast Texas, is presented beautifully among other local artists’ work in the following photo. The County Line Magazine reviewed the book in March 2013 issue, Artist Publishes Book of Her Northeast Texas Views (Click here to read the review online).

My book displayed with other art pieces and painting in Flying Fish Gallery
The painting is by Anup Bhandari

For more information about my book, go to MY NORTHEAST TEXAS.

A Wedding in Fruitvale, Texas

Black and White, Family Affair, Fruitvale, Photography, Upper East Texas, Way of Life, Wedding

Fruitvale, Texas – Spring 2012

In a little tiny corner of this gargantuan state, the corner some call North Texas, Northeast Texas, East Texas, or Upper East Side of Texas, about a mile east of the intersection between two important highways, US Highway 80 and Texas Highway 19, there’s a tiny city called Fruitvale. It’s an ordinary place, at first sight. Just two highways slicing through small towns, pastures, ranches, quiet communities, bumpy county roads. Trains towing industrial cars. There is no grand canyon or enormous rock monuments. No wide rivers with magnificent old steel bridges. There are no bustling boulevards, nor arrondissement. No modern architectural marvels. No central park dotted with art installations.

It is a community that came into being with the arrival of the Texas and Pacific Railroad in 1873. The town site was initially a railroad switch, which is where the rail track diverges from the main track into a short branch or spur. The switch was called Bolton Switch. One of its early endeavors was cord wood and cross ties, cut from local timber, and used in the construction of the rail lines. In 1903 another industry was thriving and gave the town its current name. About 20,000 fruit trees had been planted and even more in the following years. Berries and other vegetables such as potatos and corn were also blossoming. The local fruit growers filed petition to change the town name to Fruitvale and, obviously, it was granted.

My fellow Texans who live here are very proud of their heritage and celebrate that with a plethora of festivals, parades, rodeos, fairs, barbecues, hoe downs, and other friendly get-to-gathers. When they aren’t having a festival of one kind or another, they are getting together to trade or to swap stuff. They are artists and artisans. They make horseshoes into hat racks. Wine bottles into wind chimes. Oil barrels into barbecue pits. The sheet metal from junked automobiles can become a pink elephant yard ornament or a huge lone star hanging over a gateway to a cattle ranch.

And a life celebration, such as wedding, is observed in an honest, free of pretense, and genuine way of their everyday life.

(Part of the essay was quoted from My Northeast Texas)

Ben Wheeler Book Fair 2012

Ben Wheeler, Book Fair, Fall, Festivals, Photography

I will be participating in this event, this Saturday, December 8th, 2012, 10am – 4pm.

Both of my books, On the Edge of the Piney Woods and My Northeast Texas will be available for preview and sale, as well as some photo prints and note cards.

Ben Wheeler Book Fair 2012

From County Line Magazine, December 2012 issue

Twenty-five authors from all over the Upper East Side of Texas and a couple of “outsiders” will share their books and writing experiences at the Ben Wheeler Book Fair on December 8 as part of the Second Saturday 279 Art Jam.

Genres represented at the book fair include general fiction, historical fiction, Christian mystery and fiction, mystery, suspense, western, romantic mystery, humor, inspirational/self help, poetry, short fiction, music criticism, essays, romance, detective, children’s fiction and poetry, photography and more.

Authors will sell, sign, and talk about their books and the writing and publishing processes. It’s free to attend, and it’s from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. at the historic and beautifully restored Elwood School House, 5475 FM 858 in downtown Ben Wheeler.

Book fair sponsors are the Ben Wheeler Arts & Historic District Foundation, County Line Magazine, and Half Price Books.

Ben Wheeler Arts & Historic District Foundation, a non-profit 501 (c) (3) corporation, was created by Brooks and Rese Gremmels to serve as the vehicle for reconstructing not only the physical aspects of Ben Wheeler and returning a sense of community to the town by providing it with various outlets through music, art, history, education, entrepreneurship, basic civil service, and philanthropy. Its Elwood School House also hosts the Ben Wheeler Children’s Library, which provides free books for children.

County Line Magazine celebrates, presents, informs, and entertains the unique territory of the “Upper East Side of Texas,” focusing on the best people, places, culture, food, art, music, and entertainment, both in print and online, that enhances the Northeast Texas experience. Special editions provide in-depth coverage of the annual Best of the Upper East Side of Texas, Home & Garden, The Arts, Summer Fun Guide, and Farm to Market.

Half Price Books is the nation’s largest family-owned new and used bookstore chain, with 115 retail locations in 16 states. The chain launched its Million Book Donation Project in 2012 in honor of its 40th anniversary and has donated books to schools and non-profit organizations throughout the country. In addition, Half Price Books hosts its Half Pint Library book drive each year to collect and distribute children’s books to those in need.

The book fair is scheduled in conjunction with the Second Saturday 279 Art Jam that spreads along Hwy 279 from Ben Wheeler to Edom and beyond. All of the galleries and other shops and restaurants will be open, and there will be live music in both towns.

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Also publicized in KERA Art and Seek’s website: Ben Wheeler Book Fair (CLICK HERE)

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The list of some of the authors by town:

Headliners:
Joe Lansdale, Nacogdoches: horror, crime, mystery, western, science fiction
Joe Nick Patoski, Wimberley: The Dallas Cowboys: The Outrageous History of the Biggest, Loudest, Most Hated, Best Loved Football Team in America; and other Texas-related books

Addison: Pam Boyd; self-help
Ben Wheeler: Tom Geddie; poetry, short fiction, music criticism, essays
Ben Wheeler: Herb Marlow; children’s, western, clean adult
Ben Wheeler: Robert L. Stevens; historical fiction, young adult
Daingerfield: George A. Allen, children’s
Edgewood: Ine Burke; photography, nature, Northeast Texas, history
Frankston: Catherine Sellers; romance, women/s fiction
Garden Ridge: Bob Doerr; mystery, thriller
Greenville: Avon Acker; fiction and historical fiction
Hawkins: Jerry Clark; mystery, suspense, western, humor, poetry, fantasy, science fiction
Jacksonville: Patricia J. La Vigne; children, young adult
Linden: Holly Joy Bowden; adult romance, poetry
Mount Pleasant: Ann Everett; romantic mystery/comedy
Mount Pleasant: Galand Nuchols; children and young adult
Nacogdoches: Kasey Lansdale; horror, mystery, science fiction; also musician
Pittsburg: Elizabeth Baker; Christian fiction and non-fiction
Texarkana: William Carl, mystery, romance, detective
Tyler: Charles H. Hayes; history
Tyler: Melinda Richarz Lyons; children’s fiction and adult non-fiction
Tyler: Marvin S. Mayer; children’s picture and chapter books
Wills Point: Randal J. Brewer; literary, contemporary fiction
Winnsboro: James R. Callan; mystery, suspense, Christian mystery, humor, and inspirational/self help

Emory Heritage Park

Architecture, Emory, Heritage Park, My Graphic Work, MySpread, Upper East Texas

STEP BACK IN TIME TO 1900’s RAINS COUNTY, TEXAS

Earlier in the month I have the honor of exploring and taking photographs of the Emory Heritage Park, in Emory, Rains County, Texas. I first contacted Ms. Keeley Roan, the Director of Community Development of The City of Emory Development Corporation and she organized the meeting. On the beautiful day of shooting, I and my ‘troop’ (my husband and 1.5 year old daughter) were greeted by the President of Rains County Historical Society, Mr. A.B. Godwin, and his wife who is also a member of the historical society, Mrs. Loretta Godwin; Rains County Judge, Mr. Wayne Wolfe; and Ms. Keeley Roan herself. Mr. Godwin led us first to The Luckett House. When he opened up the front door and ushered us into the house the feeling of stepping back in the era of 1900’s rushing in. And that was just the start.

See, learn, and experience The Emory Heritage Park yourself through my pictures, presented with some background information. And if you are interested in visiting the park, the next event will be “Back to School Bash”, August 4th, 2012. All buildings / structures will be opened for public.

For more information, contact: Ms. Keeley Roan, Director of Community Development of The City of Emory Development Corporation, 903-473-2465 x 112, email: keeley@emorytx.com, website: www.emorytx.com.

Read the article in County Line Magazine‘s August 2012 issue.

Mr. A.B. Godwin & Mrs. Loretta Godwin from Rains County Historical Society, Mr. Wayne Wolfe -Rains County Judge, and Ms. Keeley Roan -Director of Community Development of The City of Emory Development Corporation.

The Gallery View

Battle of the Neches Memorial 33

The Battle of the Neches Memorial 2012

Historic Site, Memorial, Nature, Photography, Redland, Summer, Upper East Texas

Battle of the Neches Memorial Ceremony, July 14th, 2012

Excerpted from “Remembering the Battle of the Neches, Cherokee Chief Bowles, Other Victims” by Shea Gilchrist, published in County Line Magazine, July 2012 issue, page 16:

“… Texas Cherokee and 12 associated tribal bands under the leadership of Chief John ‘Duwa ‘li’ Bowles, Chief Big Mush, and six other tribal chiefs were slain July 16, 1839. The massacre by the Republic of Texas Army, under the direction of President Mirabeau Lamar, took the lives of many innocent men, women, and children along with the burning of a Delaware village. The associated Indian tribal bands were Cherokee, Shawnee, Delaware, Kickapoo, Quapaw, Choctaw, Biloxi, Ioni, Alabama, Coushatta, Caddo of the Neches, Tahocullake, Mataquo and possibly other groups.

In 1936, the State of Texas erected a marker to honor Chief Bowles on the land. It is believed that Bowles died 20 feet in proximity to the marker. When visiting the land, there is a definite feeling of peace, the mystical, and the sacred.

… The most important event they hold on the land each year is the Battle of the Neches memorial ceremony held this year on July 14th.”

The land and historical marker is located at Redland, from Hwy 64 between Edom and Tyler take CR 4923, keep left on a split, keep going and look for the signs “Chief Bowles Memorial”.

Visit their website at www.aics1839.com.

Battle of the Neches Memorial 3

Battle of the Neches Memorial 9

Battle of the Neches Memorial 17

Battle of the Neches Memorial 30

Battle of the Neches Memorial Day 36 - Double Rainbows at the Site 1

Rains County Founder’s Day Festival 2012

Emory, Festivals, Old Downtown, Photography, Summer, Upper East Texas, Way of Life

Rains County Founder’s Day Festival, May 5th, 2012
The festival is celebrating the heritage and pioneer spirit of Rains County. This year’s festival coincides with Cinco de Mayo. This post covers the Founder’s Day Parade in front of Rains County Courthouse, Ford Model A Car Show, Tonantsi Dance by Rains High School Spanish Club, and Radio Control Airplane demonstration.

RainsCo Founders Day | May 2012-20

Tonantsi Dance by Rains High School Spanish Club

Athens Fiddlers Reunion 2012 - 02

Athens Old Fiddlers Reunion 2012

Athens, Black and White, Festivals, Old Downtown, Photography, Spring, Upper East Texas, Way of Life

“East Texas was noted for fiddlers from the time of Sam Houston and Dave Crockett.  Every house raising, log rolling, quilting bee and corn husking was followed by a night of dancing, the square, waltz and the schottische till dawn.  Fiddlers were in demand and plentiful.  Every young swain had to learn to play for the popularity and a small amount of cash.” – Excerpted from Athens Old Fiddlers Reunion’s website.

The 81st edition of Athens Old Fiddlers Reunion was held on May 25th, 2012. It took place all day at Henderson County Courthouse yard in downtown Athens. A fairground was also set up across the courthouse.

Athens Fiddlers Reunion 2012 - 02

Athens Fiddlers Reunion 2012 - 04

Athens Fiddlers Reunion 2012 - 08

Athens Fiddlers Reunion 2012 - 19

Athens Fiddlers Reunion 2012 - 25

Ms. Pearl Cantrell, playing her ukulele, accompanied by daughter, Malia Cantrell, from Seven Points, Tx. Ms. Pearl Cantrell has brought Hawaiian music programs as a visiting instructor to Kemp Primary students two years in a row.