7 Days of Nature Photo Challenge

Edgewood, Nature, Photography, Texas
This challenge was done on Facebook, January 25 to 31, 2016.
Day 1
Black Birds-160110-156_0114

Title: The Birds

Date: January, 2016

A massive flock of black birds is a common wintertime phenomenon in East Texas. It sounds and looks like scenes from Alfred Hitchcock’s thriller, The Birds. The massiveness of the flock against the silhouette of tree branches in this photograph is a reminiscent of oriental style painting.

 

Day 2

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Title: Tangled

Date: July, 2015

A toad cobwebbed outside the kitchen window.

 

Day 3

Subtle Blossoms-150506-146_0150

Title: Wallflower, Wallflower, won’t you Dance with Me

Date: May, 2015

A colossal show of privet blossoms in the end of spring is another phenomenon to enjoy around pastures and woods of East Texas. Unlike “The Birds”, these walls of flowers are quiet, but they offer a very pleasant sweet odor, especially in the evening.

 

Day 4

Snapping Turtle-120427-L1002975

Title: Mug Shot of a Snapping Turtle

Date: April, 2012

A prehistoric looking snapping turtle being transported to a nearby Crooked Creek from a county bridge construction site.

 

Day 5

Camper Nature Trail-140222-136_0008

Title: Camper’s Nature Trail

Date: February, 2014

A dense grove of ash tree along the Camper’s nature trail.

 

Day 6

Mushroom-150530-146_0033

Title: Fairy’s Stairway

Date: May, 2015

Mushrooms grow on a dead oak tree stump.

 

Day 7

Fog-150120-146_0110-Edit-Edit-2-Edit-Edit

Title: Misty

Date: January, 2015

All reaches out to the sun, wanting it to come out of the obscuring mist.

 

© Ine Burke | inegaleri.com

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Wings of the City – El Tiempo

Architecture, Black and White, Texas

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(Time) – This highly detailed figure is incomplete. Despite his fractured body, he spreads his wings in the air and the expression on his face is full of determination. Consider the title of the work. What message does this piece have for you? – from Wings of the City, Self Guided Tour. This piece was exhibited at Fort Worth Water Gardens, overlooking the cascading water down the terraces and steps of the Active Pool and the Texas A&M University School of Law.

El Tiempo-2 El Tiempo-3 El Tiempo-4 El Tiempo-5Photographs @ 2015 Ine Burke | inegaleri.com

Wings of the City – Abrazo Monumental

Architecture, Black and White, Texas

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(Monumental Embrace) – This sculpture represents a winged man embracing a woman in a charged moment full of hope and compassion. Do you think art often evokes strong emotions in the viewer? Why or why not? Be sure to walk all the way around the piece to admire the detail in the wings. – from Wings of the City, Self Guided Tour.  This one of three bronze sculptures by Jorge Marin which were exhibited at Fort Worth Water Garden, this summer. This part of the water garden is called The Mountain. #ShowyourWingsFW

Abrazo Monumental-3  Abrazo Monumental-4

Abrazo Monumental-2

Abrazo Monumental-5

Abrazo Monumental-7

Abrazo Monumental-8Photographs © 2015 Ine Burke | inegaleri.com

Wings of the City – Archivaldo

Architecture, Black and White, Texas

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“(Archivaldo) – This winged figure fixes his gaze directly in front of him. Consider where this figure is placed, in front of the Fort Worth Convention center. What is this piece’s relationship with the architecture? Does he complement the space?” – from Wings of the City, Self Guided Tour. Archivaldo is placed in front of the Fort Worth Convention Center, North Entrance, by General Worth Square, downtown Fort Worth, Tx. It is gazing towards the direction of Alas de México (see the last photo).

Archivaldo-1 Archivaldo-2 Archivaldo-3 Archivaldo-4Photographs © 2015 Ine Burke | inegaleri.com

Wings of the City – Bernardo Oriental Monumental

Architecture, Black and White, Texas

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“(Monumental Bernardo Oriental) – This seated figure rests his arms behind him while firmly placing his feet on the sphere. Notice the type of hat he wears and think about how it relates to the exhibition. Why do you think the artist chose to mask these figures?” from Wings of the City, Self Guided Tour. This second sculpture is placed at General Worth Square, near Fort Worth Convention Center. #ShowyourWingsFW

Bernardo Oriental Monumental-4 Bernardo Oriental Monumental-2 Bernardo Oriental Monumental-1Photographs © 2015 Ine Burke | inegaleri.com

Wings of the City – Alas de México

Architecture, Black and White, Texas

Eight bronze figures created by the internationally acclaimed contemporary sculptor from Mexico, Jorge Marin, are now exhibited in downtown Fort Worth, Texas, until the end of August 2015.  I captured five out of the eight sculptures.  This one is titled “Alas de México” or “Wings of Mexico” and placed at the Sundance Square Plaza. “It encourages interaction by allowing visitors to see, touch and take pictures with the sculpture. Thousands of people around the world have had their portraits taken with the wings.” #ShowyourWingsFW

Alas de Mexico-3“Alas de México” with Tarrant County Courthouse on the background

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Alas de Mexico-4 Alas de Mexico-5

Alas de Mexico-6

 Photographs © 2015 Ine Burke | inegaleri.com

Nacogdoches Azalea Trail

Festivals, Historic Parkway, Nature, Spring, Texas

We are not too far from having these indulgence all over again.  Spring is just around the corner.  It’s peeking and waiting patiently for this wintry weather to pass.  Soon the spring blossoms will take over.  Daffodils have already started it.  Azalea and dogwood will follow soon.  This is Nacogdoches azalea trail which claims to be the largest azalea garden in Texas.  La Nana Creek is the dividing line between the Stephen F. Austin Mast Arboretum and Ruby M. Mize azalea garden where these photographs were taken last year.  See them for yourself!

Link: http://www.azaleas.visitnacogdoches.org/

All photographs © 2015 Ine Burke | inegaleri,com

All Creatures Great and Small: Holiday Exhibition at Bush Presidential Library

Dallas, Memorial, Museum, Photography, Texas

In 2002, Mrs. Laura Bush selected All Creatures Great and Small as the theme to celebrate the joy and comfort pets have brought presidents and their families during their time in the White House.

Bush Presidential Library and Museum archivists and curators are re-creating the 2002 White House holiday displays.  These are now exhibited at the George W Bush Presidential Library and Museum, Dallas, Texas, until January 13th, 2015.

GWB Library Christmas-1-3~

As part of “All Creatures Great and Small” theme 2002, White House staffers painstakingly built and painted 25 papier-maché of sculptures of pets of America’s Presidents. These animals decorated mantles and tables throughout the White House.  The animals included raccoons that were walked on leashes, sheep that grazed the White House lawn, and even alligator that was kept in the White House bathtub!

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Nelson, President George Washington’s war charger.

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Laddie Boy, an airedale terrier that belonged to President Warren G. Harding & Mrs. Florence Harding.  He brought Mr. President his morning newspaper, had his own chair to sit in during cabinet meetings. The first Presidential Pet that was covered regularly by news reporters on Washington Star and the New York Times.
“Whether the Creator planned it so, or the environment and human companionship have made it so, men may learn richly through the love and fidelity of a brave and devoted dog.” – President Warren G. Harding. Other President Harding White House pets: English bulldog, Old Boy; squirrel, Pete, and canaries. (1921-1923)GWB Library Christmas-8 ~GWB Library Christmas-9~

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The stately 18-feet 2002 White House Christmas tree, re-created for Museum visitors, features native bird ornaments that were handcrafted by artists and artisans in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and U.S. territories.

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This picture below was used for the official 2002 White House Christmas greeting card.

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Mrs. Laura Bush’s Christmas dresses

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Learn more about the Library: http://www.georgewbushlibrary.smu.edu/

GWB Library Christmas-1-4Photographs ©2014 Ine Burke | inegaleri.com

Marshall Wonderland of Lights

Architecture, Festivals, Historic Site, Main Street City Texas, Marshall, Old Downtown, Photography, Texas, Travel, Upper East Texas, Winter

light  |līt|
noun
1| the natural agent that stimulates sight and makes things visible

2| an area of something that is brighter or paler than its surroundings

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This is my take on the Marshall Wonderland of Lights Festival, in Marshall, Texas, December 2013.

Marshall Wonderland of Lights

The Historic Harrison County Courthouse, Texas, the center stage of the festival.

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Marshall Wonderland of Lights

The Courthouse 2

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Marshall Wonderland of Lights

The Courthouse 3 – taken from the Horse Carriage Ride, from southwest of the Peter Whetstone Square

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Marshall Wonderland of Lights

The Courthouse viewed from around Peter Whetstone Square – 1

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Marshall Wonderland of Lights

The Courthouse viewed from around Peter Whetstone Square – 2

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Marshall Wonderland of Lights

The Courthouse viewed from around Peter Whetstone Square – 3

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Marshall Wonderland of Lights

The Courthouse viewed from around Peter Whetstone Square – 4

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Marshall Wonderland of Lights

The Horse Carriage Ride along North Washington Avenue

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Marshall Wonderland of Lights

The Courthouse viewed from North Washington Avenue and East Austin Street – 1

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Marshall Wonderland of Lights

The Courthouse viewed from North Washington Avenue and East Austin Street – 2

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Marshall Wonderland of Lights

Lights from vendor and ticket booths opposite the Telegraph Park -1

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Marshall Wonderland of Lights

Lights from vendor and ticket booths opposite the Telegraph Park -2

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© Ine Burke 2014

Link to Marshall Wonderland of Lights Festival.

Discover 300 Years of History in 35 Miles in Van Zandt County, Texas

Edgewood, Fruitvale, Grand Saline, Historic Parkway, Historic Site, MySpread, Texas, Travel, Upper East Texas, Wills Point

SELF-GUIDED TOUR OF THE DALLAS-SHREVEPORT HISTORIC PARKWAY IN VAN ZANDT COUNTY

BY INE BURKE for the County Line Magazine October 2012

The early native American Caddo established a trail from the Red River in Louisiana, as far west as the Pecos River to trade with the Jumano who inhabited West Texas. The trail later evolved into main route from the river port in Shreveport to North Texas. Now, historical societies in North Texas are working to research and preserve this historic road. In Van Zandt County, the work has been done by The Old Dallas – Shreveport Preservation Association, established in 1993, whose committees are also members of the county historical societies. Being the most advanced in the effort among other counties, the committee has put up road signs and historical markers along the path, enabling people to do a self-guided tour and discover at least 300 years of history along the 35-mile section of this county’s historical route.

The Old Dallas-Shreveport Road’s existence shaped the towns and communities in northeast Texas. The Texas and Pacific Railway was laid parallel to the Old Dallas-Shreveport Road about a mile northward in 1873. US Highway 80 was established later. It is also laid parallel to the historic road and was initially known as the “Dixie Overland Trail” in 1914. Its name became TX15 in 1919 and later US80 in 1926. The arrival of the railway and US80 ended the era of the Old Dallas-Shreveport Road as a major thoroughfare. See the history timeline of the old road at the end of this article.

THE TOUR

The Dallas-Shreveport Road Historic Parkway, Van Zandt County, Tx

Dallas-Shreveport Historic Parkway in Van Zandt County, Texas

Tour this historical parkway eastward point by point from Wills Point to Sand Flat in Van Zandt County, Texas.

1. The tour starts at the junction of HWY64 and CR3415 in Wills Point, just south of US80. The founders of Wills Point first settled here in 1847 and the County Seat War took place in 1877 along this part of the Dallas-Shreveport Road.

2. About 4 miles from Point 1 – New Hope Cemetery. A veteran of the Texas war for independence from Mexico, set aside some acres to encourage settlement around 1871. He and four confederate soldiers are among those who were buried here.

3. FM1504 and CR3215. A cotton gin is believed to have been located near this crossroads. About 450 yards from the intersection, where the road bends right, a freight company stop used to operate in the mid 1800’s.

4. From CR3215 to CR3216, 300 yards on left. Slaughter School, built in 1888, fulfilled the need for a school due to the population growth along the road. It was later consolidated with the Edgewood school district. Go back to CR3215.

5. Barren Ridge. Continue to CR3218, cross FM859 to CR3118, turn right to CR3105, pass CR3109. This is where the Black Land Prairie meets the Post Oak Savannah, thus name ‘Edgewood’. Barren Ridge used to be a savannah. The cultivation brought by the settlers is the reason why the trees are there now. A post office and stage stop was once located here from 1850 to 1857. The citizens of Canton once traveled 8 miles here for their mail.

Crooked Creek, Van Zandt County, Tx

Between Point 5-6: Crooked Creek, Van Zandt County, Tx

Between 5-6. Continue through a grove where the canopy of trees thickens. Sunken trails on either side of the road were the original Dallas-Shreveport road bed. From an unguarded wooden bridge, the steep Crooked Creek’s bank is noticeable. Where the road bends right, the original trail bends away into private lands towards Point 7.

6. A mile from the bridge, stands a tree that grows almost in the middle of the road. Back in the 1800’s, surveyors often used a tree on the land they surveyed as the benchmark, and called this tree the witness tree. This is one of them.

7. To TX19 and go north. The location of Point 7 is on private property, approximately across CR3108, on right. It’s a crossing with deep vertical banks near Mill Creek, and is part of the old Caddo trail. The early pioneers who traveled this road called it Devil’s Gap due to raids by Kiowa and other native American tribes who used this part of the trail as an attack point. Stop at the Mill Creek bridge (past Point 8), to visualize the condition.

8. From TX19 turn right to CR1117. About 0.5 miles down the road, on the left across from a private mailbox, there’s a steel sign post, where Father Jose Calahorra Historical Marker once was. The marker was stolen after its dedication in 2009. It is such a shame, considering that it’s the oldest historical facts found so far related to this part of the road. This is where the Caddo trail intersected Tawakoni trail that went from the Sabine River in the north to Nacogdoches in the south. The entourage of Father Jose Calahorra, a well-respected Spanish missionary in Texas, was greeted here and then escorted by the Tawakoni to their village on the Sabine River in 1760, 1761, and 1764.

9. Cherokee Survey Line, dated 1841, crosses the CR1117 1 mile down the road from Point 8.

10. About 4.5 miles from Point 8, on CR1817, on left. An effort to colonize an area of North Central Texas and settle 500 families in 5 years was led by Charles Mercer in 1844. The boundaries were Palestine and Waco on the south, the Brazos River on the west, McKinney area on the north, and this point on the east. Descendants of Mercer’s colony settlers still reside in Texas.

Point 8: Father Jose Calahorra Historical Marker Dedication

Point 8: Father Jose Calahorra Historical Marker Dedication

11. Turn right to CR1818. The marker is in the Creagleville Cemetery. The Dallas-Shreveport Road went through Creagleville, a community named after Henry Creagle, a German native who settled in Van Zandt County in 1847.The agricultural community once had a school, church, cotton gin, gristmill, and cemetery. Only the cemetery remains today.

12. Straight ahead to CR1820, to the intersection with CR1824, on left. During the Civil War, people from the southeast fled west and formed a community here around 1863, on land where the property owners were away at war. Poles were used to build homes, thus Poletown. After the war, arrangements were made for them to purchase land or become tenant farmers. Jacob C. Rhodes’ land in Poletown was designated as a new town, Rhodesburg, in 1895. Rhodes was a member of the Populist Party, who then changed to and organized the Socialist Party of Texas. For over a decade the town accommodated the Socialist Party’s movement.

13. Continue to CR1823/W Patterson St. Take a glance at Morton Salt Company Lake, on right, a private man-made lake built by B.W. Carrington & Company in 1911 for the salt plant use.

14. Continue east on Hwy17 to the meeting point with Hwy110. The original road goes straight through private lands and picks up again at Point 18.Take left on Hwy110/FM17.  An old cotton gin sits on the left. Continue through historic downtown Grand Saline to the intersection with US80.

15. Across the junction of Hwy110/FM17 and US80, on left – The Salt Palace is a tiny building made of pure salt that has been rebuilt three times since its debut in 1936 due to deterioration caused by weather. Inside, it exhibits the salt industry and history of Grand Saline. Wiley H. Post, one of world’s greatest pioneer aviators who is a native son of Van Zandt County, is also remembered here.

Point 14: 1890 Coton Gin, Grand Saline, Tx

Point 14: 1890 Coton Gin, Grand Saline, Tx

16. Continue 0.5 mile east on US80, take right to FM857. Kleer Park is located on the left. During the Civil War, the demand for salt increased significantly to preserve food and hides. Salt workers were exempted from army service. The salt mine in Grand Saline was once named Kleer Mine. It was operated by the Confederacy during the war.

17. Salt Flat, Marsh, and Birds Sanctuary on FM857, by the first concrete bridge. Take a peek at the white surface of one of the largest and purest salt domes in the country. Its depth is unknown and its supply of the valuable mineral is estimated to last 20,000 years. The Cherokee were the first to obtain salt from here in the early 1800’s. It is now designated as a bird sanctuary.

18. Jordan’s Saline and the site of the first courthouse, by the second bridge, across CR1701. It’s the oldest community in Van Zandt County, established by John Jordan in 1844, even before the county was formed in 1848. It was once the County Seat before being moved to Canton in 1850. By 1860 it had a thriving salt industry. The community diminished after the railroad arrived in 1873 and the townsite was relocated one mile north and named Grand Saline.

19. Continue 2.8 miles, to the junction of FM1255 (Crockett’s Bluff Road) and FM857, on Sand Flat Cemetery property. It’s a small community that sprung up along the historic road in the 1850’s. It was first known as Chrestman, then Sand Flat, and later “Fulton” when a post office was in operation from 1900-1905. The community retained the name Sand Flat.

20. Continue on FM 857 to Providence, another community that grew along the road in the 1850’s. It’s the eastern end of the historic parkway in Van Zandt County. Providence Cemetery, established in 1873, is just past the Smith County line. Spanish explorer, Pedro Vial may have used part of this road in 1788. End of the tour. Continue to the intersection with FM1253, go north 3.4 miles to get to US80.

Beyond Van Zandt County to the east, the route resumes about 3.5 miles south on FM1253 from Providence, take CR452 on left. From Wills Point to the west, the route goes northwest towards Rockwall, then to downtown Dallas (Bird’s Fort by Trinity River) – also recognized as the historical Central National Road of the Republic of Texas; then to Arlington and end at Fort Worth. Dallas was actually built on the old Caddo trade trail. ~

The article was published in the County Line Magazine: http://www.countylinemagazine.com/October-2012/Discover-300/

History Timeline of the Dallas - Shreveport Road

History Timeline of the Dallas – Shreveport Road

Highway 80 Sale

Black and White, Edgewood, Fall, Photography, Spring, Texas, Trading, Upper East Texas, Way of Life

Each year, on the 3rd weekend in April and October, a sale along US Highway 80 is being held. The historic US Highway 80 stretches from Savannah, Georgia, to San Diego, California. The sale, however, is a three-state-event, starts from Mesquite, Texas, through Louisiana, and ends in Jackson, Mississippi. Antiques, flea-market items, plants, ‘this-and-that’ are among the sale items. This is one of the sale spots called Redhaw Creek Trade Days, at the crossroad of Highway 19 and 80.

Link to US Highway 80 Sale website.