Holiday Spirits

Beyond, Christmas, Edgewood, My Graphic Work, MySpread, Photography, Winter

Christmas season inspired photographs and graphic work.

baklava-peace

Tea time with homemade baklava

bass-glory

The angel on high – Bass Performance Center, Fort Worth, Tx

asbamoncarter-hope

Rainbow of Promise, Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort Worth, Tx

border-cantos-compassion

Border Cantos exhibition, Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort Worth, Tx

christmas-light-joy

House Christmas light

crescent-moon-smile

Winter crescent moon

© Ine Burke | inegaleri.com

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Edgewood Heritage Festival 2015

Edgewood, Fall, Festivals, My Graphic Work, MySpread, Photography

For the fourth time, I will be a part of the Edgewood Heritage Festival which will be held this coming Saturday, November 14th, 2015, 9AM – 4PM, in downtown Edgewood, Tx.  What makes this festival very special is that it is nested right inside the Heritage Park Museum of East Texas that comprises of 22 historic buildings, fully restored and furnished. You will feel like you step back in time to the year of early 1900’s in a rural village of East Texas. The hosts, who are the members and volunteers of the Heritage Park Museum board, will dress in the period costumes. The main streets of the old downtown Edgewood will be covered with classic cars, antique tractors, and old engines. Not to mention the heritage entertainment brought by children of Edgewood, such as Cotton-Eyed Joe dance, and many others! It truly looks like the time when the cotton was booming in Edgewood and the farmer took their harvest to weigh and sell. You’ve got to come and see it for yourself! And visit my booth at The Section House, by the Murchison Train Depot! I will be presenting my latest photography works and new sets of note cards and small prints. See you there!

EHF2015 INEGALERIGraphic works & photograph © 2015 Ine Burke | inegaleri.com

Explore by Van Zandt Newspapers

Edgewood, My Graphic Work, MySpread, Spring

My photo is recently used as the cover for the annual publication of Van Zandt Newspapers, Explore 2015/2016.  It’s a complimentary publication dedicated to Van Zandt County, Texas, and the surrounding area, its history, communities, businesses, and activities.

Indian Paintbrush Edgewood IBurke-S VZ Explorer 2015-2016001 VZ Explorer 2015-2016004VZ Explorer 2015-2016003

Photograph © Ine Burke | inegaleri.com

Van Zandt County Authors Showcase

Book Fair, Canton, My Graphic Work, MySpread

I will be one of the authors of Van Zandt County, Texas, showcasing and selling their works at Van Zandt County Authors Showcase. The event is held by the Friends of the Library, in lieu of National Library Week, this coming Thursday, April 16th, 2015, 5-7 pm, at the Van Zandt County Library, Canton, Tx. Open for public.

Books Promo Leaflet S© 2015 Ine Burke | inegaleri.com

135th Anniversary of Cheatham Memorial UMC’s Artwork

Edgewood, Festivals, Heritage Park, Memorial, My Graphic Work, MySpread

The Cheatham Memorial United Methodist Church in Edgewood, Tx., where I am a member, celebrated its 135th anniversary this year.  The theme “A Legacy of Faith” was chosen for this celebration. The past members and pastors were invited to rejoice with current members and we call it a Homecoming Celebration. I am honored to be one of the planning team members and help with the artwork / press release / publications. History background and the United Methodist Church’s logo (the flame and cross) were the concept used to do the artwork.  The works begun in February 2014. First, the anniversary logo was created and it depicts the front view of the church entryway to the sanctuary, with an open door. The cross and flame double-functions as the “T” in Cheatham. The Texas Historical Marker’s icon that the church received in 1982, was also included. The logo was used for any church communications regarding the event.

Print

The more colorful design was to be used as teaser, advertisements, invitations, reminders, etc., as the church built the momentum towards the big day in October 2014 (six months planning period). For this, the colorful play of the flame was applied. The initial design suggested that each flame would represent the ministries of the church.

135 A Flames Design

The church, which was born in 1879, has rich historical background. The congregations have been worshiping in 5 buildings in its 135 years course. The first two buildings served both Methodist church and Edgewood school. The church and school separated in 1897. The latter three church buildings were then incorporated into the design to commemorate this incredible heritage. The initial hand sketches are shown below. The top-left is the Church in the Wildwood (1897-1923) – the insert on top-right is the second version that was eventually being used in the artworks; the top-middle is the first church brick building (1923-1953); and the current church brick building (1953-now) is depicted in the middle. The bottom sketch is one of my draft sketches for logo idea.

135 B Church Original Sketches IB

These three-church sketches and the flame-and-cross icon were combined in the following works which were dispersed in the forms of postcards, bulletin, also electronic copies. During the discussions with the planning team, the idea “the church is the people” was suggested. I kept that in mind and the opportunity to express that came through the cover of A Legacy of Faith, an illustrated history book which was published to commemorate the anniversary. See it at A Legacy of Faith.

135 C Save the Date

135 C Invite Revised

135 C Postcard AOK

Facebook cover page.

135 FB Cover Page

Outdoor banners, 2×5 feet.

135 D BANNER OUTDOOR 2x5ft

Indoor banner, 3×8 feet.

135 D BANNER INDOOR 3x8ft

Bulletin covers and name tag for the two main events maintained the visual identity.

Name Tag Graphic CMUMC

135 D BULLETIN OCT18

135 D BULLETIN OCT19

A simpler black and white design, with orange flame, was applied for souvenirs such as cotton tote bag, decals. The color was inverted for the chosen black t-shirts.

135 E Canvas Bag135 E Decals We Belong

 

135 E T-Shirt Design

135 E T-Shirt Photo

© 2014 Ine Burke for Cheatham Memorial United Methodist Church, Edgewood, Texas.

38th Annual Edgewood Heritage Festival’s Artwork

Edgewood, Festivals, Heritage Park, My Graphic Work, MySpread, Travel, Upper East Texas

Once again, I had the honor to do the branding for the 38th Annual Edgewood Heritage Festival, in Edgewood, Tx.  From Facebook cover page, rack card, window flyer, print and electronic advertisement for several publications, to t-shirt and poster. The Blacksmith Shop was chosen as the annual collectible ornament so it is used in the artworks.

 

To see last year’s visual identity, go to: https://inegaleri.com/2013/08/23/37th-edgewood-heritage-festival-van-zandt-county-texas/

A LEGACY OF FAITH

Book Fair, Edgewood, Historic Site, My Graphic Work, MySpread

A commemorative book for the 135th Anniversary of Cheatham Memorial United Methodist Church, Edgewood, Texas. Published October 2014.

A Legacy of Faith - Published October 2014To commemorate its 135 years of incredible heritage, the Cheatham Memorial United Methodist Church has published “A Legacy of Faith”, an illustrated history book organized, researched, and designed by Ine Burke.  Founded in 1879, the Methodist church is the first church established in the town of Edgewood, Texas. The forefathers and mothers of the church were the pioneers of Van Zandt County.

1972 Joe V. Clouse - The first church history bookThe beginning of the church history is preceded with an essay, strengthened by timeline charts, of how Van Zandt county and Edgewood was formed. Inspired by the first church’s history book published in 1972 by Rev. Joe V. Clouse, this book follows the evolution of the church in the context of historical, civic, and cultural change that direct its fellowship, services, and ministries to the current state.  Its struggles and development keep evolving, from the era of the Old Dallas-Shreveport Road, through the World Wars and great depression time, to the current issues. Several local publications listed in the bibliography include “Building a County” by Elvis Allen, “The Edgewood Story” by Authula M. McLemore & Eloise Pettigrew Ellis, and “Van Zandt County Texas Pictorial History 1848-1994 Volume III” by the Van Zandt County Texas Historical Commission.

A Legacy of Faith - ContentThe history of the church is traced through 200 images including historical and new photographs, timelines, illustrations, works of art, building plans, and artifacts. The written and pictorial works were contributed by many church members whose names are chronicled throughout the book.

A Legacy of Faith - Front and Back coverWith the phrase “THE CHURCH IS THE PEOPLE” in mind, the cover of the book depicts the front view of the current building, with the congregation interacting on a regular Sunday service. Ine Burke challenged herself and went outside her ”comfort-zone” by doing the acrylic painting that wraps around this 8.3”x10.2”, 130-page, hardcover book.  The book is available for purchase through Cheatham Memorial United Methodist Church in Edgewood (903-896-4935). It will also be brought by Ine Burke to the Ben Wheeler Book Fair, Saturday, November 29th, at the Elwood Schoolhouse, downtown Ben Wheeler, Tx. The price per book is $45. ***

A Legacy of Faith-1-2

“No-Mean Feet” – Wine bottle label design for Crooked Creek Vineyards

Countryscape, Edgewood, My Graphic Work, MySpread, Upper East Texas

Wine bottle label design for Crooked Creek Vineyards‘ “No-Mean Feet” 2013 Lenoir.

The background is a cut-out rendition from photograph of pine trees that grow by a pond within the property of the vineyard.

2013 Wine Label CC3 2013 Wine Label CC3Back

Here’s how they look on the bottles (with the vineyard at the background):

© 2014 Ine Burke

 

Graphic Design Work for Texas Booth

Edgewood, Festivals, My Graphic Work, MySpread
Texas Jam & Jelly

Design graphic work by Ine Burke for Texas Booth, Edgewood Heritage Festival 2013.

This is a graphic design work that I did for Texas Booth at the Edgewood Heritage Festival 2013, which carries homemade jams and jellies and handcrafted Christmas ornaments. This was used for e-promotion through the festival’s Facebook page.

Ben Wheeler Book Fair Graphic Work

Ben Wheeler, Book Fair, My Graphic Work, MySpread, Upper East Texas

I took a design graphic work challenge for the 2nd Annual Ben Wheeler Book Fair, which I will be part of, and the organizer put it to use in the form of flyer and printed advertisement in County Line Magazine.

BW Book Fair Flyer2R-Small

BW Flyer in CLM2013

The Dancing Trees – A new book by Ine Burke & Harold Burke

Edgewood, My Graphic Work, MySpread, Photography

THE DANCING TREES

Photographs & Words

A new book by Ine Burke & Harold Burke

To be released on November 9th, 2013, at the 37th Edgewood Heritage Festival.

TDT Cover 2013

THE DANCING TREES
Photographs and Words

Photographs by Ine Burke
The Dancing Trees brings together nine photo essays capturing objects normally seen, and some unexpectedly found, in a rural farmstead and in old downtown Edgewood, Texas. It’s simply about the things that we treasure and respect. Care and love. Discover and research. Or just the things that we enjoy doing.

~ Ine Burke

Words by Harold Burke
The words are inspired by Ine’s beautiful photographs, and by our simple life on the farm in East Texas with our wonderful daughter, Alafair. And our dog, Hank.

~ Harold Burke

Book description
Hardbound Case / 8”x10” / 94 Pages / 9 Chapters /
68 Color and Black-and-White Photographs / 22 Poems

November 2013

Edgewood, Texas

Contents
About
List of Photographs and Words
Chapter I: Artifacts
Chapter II: The Barnyard
Chapter III: Edgewood
Chapter IV: The Garden
Chapter V: Horses
Chapter VI: Hunting
Chapter VII: The Dancing Trees
Chapter VIII: Patterns in Nature
Chapter IX: Alafair

Preview

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Discover 300 Years of History in 35 Miles in Van Zandt County, Texas

Edgewood, Fruitvale, Grand Saline, Historic Parkway, Historic Site, MySpread, Texas, Travel, Upper East Texas, Wills Point

SELF-GUIDED TOUR OF THE DALLAS-SHREVEPORT HISTORIC PARKWAY IN VAN ZANDT COUNTY

BY INE BURKE for the County Line Magazine October 2012

The early native American Caddo established a trail from the Red River in Louisiana, as far west as the Pecos River to trade with the Jumano who inhabited West Texas. The trail later evolved into main route from the river port in Shreveport to North Texas. Now, historical societies in North Texas are working to research and preserve this historic road. In Van Zandt County, the work has been done by The Old Dallas – Shreveport Preservation Association, established in 1993, whose committees are also members of the county historical societies. Being the most advanced in the effort among other counties, the committee has put up road signs and historical markers along the path, enabling people to do a self-guided tour and discover at least 300 years of history along the 35-mile section of this county’s historical route.

The Old Dallas-Shreveport Road’s existence shaped the towns and communities in northeast Texas. The Texas and Pacific Railway was laid parallel to the Old Dallas-Shreveport Road about a mile northward in 1873. US Highway 80 was established later. It is also laid parallel to the historic road and was initially known as the “Dixie Overland Trail” in 1914. Its name became TX15 in 1919 and later US80 in 1926. The arrival of the railway and US80 ended the era of the Old Dallas-Shreveport Road as a major thoroughfare. See the history timeline of the old road at the end of this article.

THE TOUR

The Dallas-Shreveport Road Historic Parkway, Van Zandt County, Tx

Dallas-Shreveport Historic Parkway in Van Zandt County, Texas

Tour this historical parkway eastward point by point from Wills Point to Sand Flat in Van Zandt County, Texas.

1. The tour starts at the junction of HWY64 and CR3415 in Wills Point, just south of US80. The founders of Wills Point first settled here in 1847 and the County Seat War took place in 1877 along this part of the Dallas-Shreveport Road.

2. About 4 miles from Point 1 – New Hope Cemetery. A veteran of the Texas war for independence from Mexico, set aside some acres to encourage settlement around 1871. He and four confederate soldiers are among those who were buried here.

3. FM1504 and CR3215. A cotton gin is believed to have been located near this crossroads. About 450 yards from the intersection, where the road bends right, a freight company stop used to operate in the mid 1800’s.

4. From CR3215 to CR3216, 300 yards on left. Slaughter School, built in 1888, fulfilled the need for a school due to the population growth along the road. It was later consolidated with the Edgewood school district. Go back to CR3215.

5. Barren Ridge. Continue to CR3218, cross FM859 to CR3118, turn right to CR3105, pass CR3109. This is where the Black Land Prairie meets the Post Oak Savannah, thus name ‘Edgewood’. Barren Ridge used to be a savannah. The cultivation brought by the settlers is the reason why the trees are there now. A post office and stage stop was once located here from 1850 to 1857. The citizens of Canton once traveled 8 miles here for their mail.

Crooked Creek, Van Zandt County, Tx

Between Point 5-6: Crooked Creek, Van Zandt County, Tx

Between 5-6. Continue through a grove where the canopy of trees thickens. Sunken trails on either side of the road were the original Dallas-Shreveport road bed. From an unguarded wooden bridge, the steep Crooked Creek’s bank is noticeable. Where the road bends right, the original trail bends away into private lands towards Point 7.

6. A mile from the bridge, stands a tree that grows almost in the middle of the road. Back in the 1800’s, surveyors often used a tree on the land they surveyed as the benchmark, and called this tree the witness tree. This is one of them.

7. To TX19 and go north. The location of Point 7 is on private property, approximately across CR3108, on right. It’s a crossing with deep vertical banks near Mill Creek, and is part of the old Caddo trail. The early pioneers who traveled this road called it Devil’s Gap due to raids by Kiowa and other native American tribes who used this part of the trail as an attack point. Stop at the Mill Creek bridge (past Point 8), to visualize the condition.

8. From TX19 turn right to CR1117. About 0.5 miles down the road, on the left across from a private mailbox, there’s a steel sign post, where Father Jose Calahorra Historical Marker once was. The marker was stolen after its dedication in 2009. It is such a shame, considering that it’s the oldest historical facts found so far related to this part of the road. This is where the Caddo trail intersected Tawakoni trail that went from the Sabine River in the north to Nacogdoches in the south. The entourage of Father Jose Calahorra, a well-respected Spanish missionary in Texas, was greeted here and then escorted by the Tawakoni to their village on the Sabine River in 1760, 1761, and 1764.

9. Cherokee Survey Line, dated 1841, crosses the CR1117 1 mile down the road from Point 8.

10. About 4.5 miles from Point 8, on CR1817, on left. An effort to colonize an area of North Central Texas and settle 500 families in 5 years was led by Charles Mercer in 1844. The boundaries were Palestine and Waco on the south, the Brazos River on the west, McKinney area on the north, and this point on the east. Descendants of Mercer’s colony settlers still reside in Texas.

Point 8: Father Jose Calahorra Historical Marker Dedication

Point 8: Father Jose Calahorra Historical Marker Dedication

11. Turn right to CR1818. The marker is in the Creagleville Cemetery. The Dallas-Shreveport Road went through Creagleville, a community named after Henry Creagle, a German native who settled in Van Zandt County in 1847.The agricultural community once had a school, church, cotton gin, gristmill, and cemetery. Only the cemetery remains today.

12. Straight ahead to CR1820, to the intersection with CR1824, on left. During the Civil War, people from the southeast fled west and formed a community here around 1863, on land where the property owners were away at war. Poles were used to build homes, thus Poletown. After the war, arrangements were made for them to purchase land or become tenant farmers. Jacob C. Rhodes’ land in Poletown was designated as a new town, Rhodesburg, in 1895. Rhodes was a member of the Populist Party, who then changed to and organized the Socialist Party of Texas. For over a decade the town accommodated the Socialist Party’s movement.

13. Continue to CR1823/W Patterson St. Take a glance at Morton Salt Company Lake, on right, a private man-made lake built by B.W. Carrington & Company in 1911 for the salt plant use.

14. Continue east on Hwy17 to the meeting point with Hwy110. The original road goes straight through private lands and picks up again at Point 18.Take left on Hwy110/FM17.  An old cotton gin sits on the left. Continue through historic downtown Grand Saline to the intersection with US80.

15. Across the junction of Hwy110/FM17 and US80, on left – The Salt Palace is a tiny building made of pure salt that has been rebuilt three times since its debut in 1936 due to deterioration caused by weather. Inside, it exhibits the salt industry and history of Grand Saline. Wiley H. Post, one of world’s greatest pioneer aviators who is a native son of Van Zandt County, is also remembered here.

Point 14: 1890 Coton Gin, Grand Saline, Tx

Point 14: 1890 Coton Gin, Grand Saline, Tx

16. Continue 0.5 mile east on US80, take right to FM857. Kleer Park is located on the left. During the Civil War, the demand for salt increased significantly to preserve food and hides. Salt workers were exempted from army service. The salt mine in Grand Saline was once named Kleer Mine. It was operated by the Confederacy during the war.

17. Salt Flat, Marsh, and Birds Sanctuary on FM857, by the first concrete bridge. Take a peek at the white surface of one of the largest and purest salt domes in the country. Its depth is unknown and its supply of the valuable mineral is estimated to last 20,000 years. The Cherokee were the first to obtain salt from here in the early 1800’s. It is now designated as a bird sanctuary.

18. Jordan’s Saline and the site of the first courthouse, by the second bridge, across CR1701. It’s the oldest community in Van Zandt County, established by John Jordan in 1844, even before the county was formed in 1848. It was once the County Seat before being moved to Canton in 1850. By 1860 it had a thriving salt industry. The community diminished after the railroad arrived in 1873 and the townsite was relocated one mile north and named Grand Saline.

19. Continue 2.8 miles, to the junction of FM1255 (Crockett’s Bluff Road) and FM857, on Sand Flat Cemetery property. It’s a small community that sprung up along the historic road in the 1850’s. It was first known as Chrestman, then Sand Flat, and later “Fulton” when a post office was in operation from 1900-1905. The community retained the name Sand Flat.

20. Continue on FM 857 to Providence, another community that grew along the road in the 1850’s. It’s the eastern end of the historic parkway in Van Zandt County. Providence Cemetery, established in 1873, is just past the Smith County line. Spanish explorer, Pedro Vial may have used part of this road in 1788. End of the tour. Continue to the intersection with FM1253, go north 3.4 miles to get to US80.

Beyond Van Zandt County to the east, the route resumes about 3.5 miles south on FM1253 from Providence, take CR452 on left. From Wills Point to the west, the route goes northwest towards Rockwall, then to downtown Dallas (Bird’s Fort by Trinity River) – also recognized as the historical Central National Road of the Republic of Texas; then to Arlington and end at Fort Worth. Dallas was actually built on the old Caddo trade trail. ~

The article was published in the County Line Magazine: http://www.countylinemagazine.com/October-2012/Discover-300/

History Timeline of the Dallas - Shreveport Road

History Timeline of the Dallas – Shreveport Road

37th Edgewood Heritage Festival, Van Zandt County, Texas

Edgewood, Festivals, My Graphic Work, MySpread
e-Advertisement in County Line eMagazine

e-Advertisement in County Line eMagazine

I have given the honor by the Edgewood Historical Society to design the artwork for the 37th Edgewood Heritage Festival this year. A sketch of The 1927 Myrtle Spring School done by a talented local artist, Paige Bridges, is used as the main focus. The picture of the two kids holding hands were taken during 2009 festival. They were getting ready for a street dance performance together with their peers from the local school during this fun event.

The festival celebrates the legacy, traditions, and customs of rural life in East Texas around late 1800s and early 1900s. What makes this festival very special and worth visiting is that the event is held in the Heritage Park Museum of East Texas that houses about 21 authentically restored and furnished historical buildings depicting a rural village in Van Zandt County in its early development. The buildings are well maintained and furnished, the ground beautifully manicured. All the buildings will be opened for tours with docents ready to tell the visitors the history of each one.

Special vintage craft demonstration are always a big part of the heritage festival. The East Texas Blacksmith Association will operate the old blacksmith shop in the village and many will bring their vintage anvils to show off their skills. The antique printing presses will be running in the restored print shop and the making of lye soap at the log smoke house will be popular spots. The restored train depot will be the destination of model train enthusiast as an extensive exhibit of trains will be operating in the freight room. A Knife and Tomahawk Throwers group will make their debut in this festival this year and demonstrate their skill and may let the visitors experience it, too.

A talent show on the main stage will offer a variety of entertainment while a dog show around the gazebo in the log village and -for the first time this yea- a DOG PARADE, will be a highlight for canine lovers. The 20th Pinto Bean Cook-off is on tap and competent beaners offer their best talents in preparing this Van Zandt County gourmet treat. These contests feature prizes to be awarded.

In addition to the popular Classic Car Show on the streets of downtown Edgewood, the third annual antique Tractor Show will attract collectors from a wide area. Each of these shows award many prizes to the participants. The Heritage Quilt Show will take place in the Edgewood Civic Center from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

One of the highlights of the day will be Sparky Sparks, “The King of Armadillo Racing”, and his famous Texas Armadillos. This must-see event will begin around 10 a.m. and will end with a ‘celebrity’ race featuring three of Van Zandt County’s well-known citizens.

Vendors Ally offers the visitors a shopping spree to remember. There will be a children’s playground area with rides, a food court featuring a variety of culinary treats and the Heritage Bake Sale will be held in the restored Gilliam Gas Station.

The festival is possible through many generous sponsors throughout the area. Net proceeds from the festival go to the future development and maintenance of Heritage Park Museum of East Texas.

Mark your calendar for the 37th Edgewood Heritage Festival:

Saturday, November 9th, 2013, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission is free. Live acoustic music will be offered throughout the day.

At the Heritage Park Museum of East Texas, downtown Edgewood, Texas (50 miles east of Dallas, 50 miles west of Tyler, on US Hwy 80)

To view the festival’s pictures go to my previous posts:

https://inegaleri.com/2012/05/04/edgewood-heritage-festival-heritage-park/

https://inegaleri.com/2012/05/04/edgewood-heritage-festival-downtown/

The event information can also be found at:

http://www.countylinemagazine.com/Things-To-Do-In-The-Upper-East-Side-Of-Texas/index.php/name/37th-Edgewood-Heritage-Festival/event/9896/

My Northeast Texas

Black and White, MySpread
Photos in the book, My Northeast Texas

Photos in the book, My Northeast Texas

Initially, there was a simple plan: pairing photographs. The photographs were taken in random places, during random journeys of running random errands, random events, and of random subjects. The intent was to intuitively pair this randomness based on visual cues, not by specific chronology or place.

The order it somewhat follows is the geography of where these photographs were captured. Texas. Well, a little tiny corner of this gargantuan state, to be exact. The corner some call North Texas, Northeast Texas, East Texas, or Upper East Side of Texas. No matter which it is called, my Texas centers at the intersection between two important highways, US Highway 80 and Texas Highway 19, in the city called Edgewood, in Van Zandt County.

It’s an ordinary place, at first sight. Just two highways slicing through small towns, pastures, ranches, quiet communities, bumpy county roads. Trains towing industrial cars. There is no grand canyon or enormous rock monuments. No wide rivers with magnificent old steel bridges. There are no bustling boulevards, nor arrondissement. No modern architectural marvels. No central park dotted with art installations.

Nevertheless, I take a great deal of photographs. Random subjects, random places. I just did that out of the love of the work itself, intriguing subjects, and curiosity. Then, the curiousity started to make things became a little bit more complicated. I started wondering how certain subjects or places came into being. When, how, and why did they all start, end, or change.

So, I did some reading and research on the history of my photographic subjects, and discovered many interesting tales from bygone days. It took me wandering from century to century, to places which no longer exist, and to events that shaped the communities today. I started to better understand the subjects in my photographs and developed a deeper respect for the places and people. It helped me to see beyond the ordinary. The initial intent was not to write a history book. Historical background or facts presented -also randomly- in the book are there just to help illuminate the subjects or the places.

In pairing this randomness, two by two, spread by spread, I see things and matters that embody Texas and Texans. At least, for now it is my own view on this little corner of Texas.
My Northeast Texas.

I also found some subjects are so independent, eloquent, and almost too arrogant to be paired. So I left them alone.

I just want to keep it simple. Simple with knowledge.

~

Preview the entire book at this link:
My Northeast Texas

~

The book is available for preview and sale at:

(1) Edgewood Heritage Park Office and Gift Shop, downtown Edgewood, Texas – (903) 896-4448 or 4358 – Open Thu-Sat, 9am-2pm

(2) The Lumberyard Cafe, 809 E. Pine Street (HWY 80), Edgewood, Texas – (903) 896-7766 – PREVIEW ONLY

(3) Nutty’s Peanut Butter Store, 233 N Main Street, Grand Saline, TX 75140 – 1-877-NUTTYSPB – www.nuttyspeanutbutter.com

(4) Means Home Centre, 1912 W. Frank Street (HWY80), Grand Saline, Texas – (903) 962-3861

(5) All Through The House, Antique/Gifts/Home Decor, 410 E. Lennon (HWY 69 East), Emory, Texas 75440 – (903) 474-9150

(6) Online at my online store (CLICK HERE)

Sale price: $40 (tax included) + Shipping for online purchase

Reviewed in March 2013 County Line Magazine and Rains County Leader (Click here)

Attention Span of a Two Year-Old – By Ine Burke

Black and White, Family Affair, My Graphic Work, MySpread, Photography, Portrait

This is a photo essay made to record how long a two year-old with a big outdoor spirit can stay focus in one activity. Dressing up in tutu dress is the first thing she asks for to match with one of her stuffed toys. The idea then leads to make-up. Eyeshadow that is. That’s where this photo essay starts. In the end, her outdoor spirit reigns supreme. She spends about 30 minutes playing eyeshadow and more than one hour exploring the gardens with her own personal guard. What a wonderful day.

AttentionSpan-1 AttentionSpan-2 AttentionSpan-3 AttentionSpan-4 AttentionSpan-5 AttentionSpan-6 AttentionSpan-7© Ine Burke / INEGALERI.COM 2013

County Line Magazine on the other Side of the World – by Ine Burke

Beyond, Beyond Upper East Texas, My Graphic Work, MySpread, Travel, Upper East Texas
CLM in INDONESIA 1

County Line Magazine in Indonesia – Page 1/3

CLM in Indonesia 2

County Line Magazine in Indonesia – Page 2/3

County Line Magazine in Indonesia - Page 3/3

County Line Magazine in Indonesia – Page 3/3

Emory Heritage Park

Architecture, Emory, Heritage Park, My Graphic Work, MySpread, Upper East Texas

STEP BACK IN TIME TO 1900’s RAINS COUNTY, TEXAS

Earlier in the month I have the honor of exploring and taking photographs of the Emory Heritage Park, in Emory, Rains County, Texas. I first contacted Ms. Keeley Roan, the Director of Community Development of The City of Emory Development Corporation and she organized the meeting. On the beautiful day of shooting, I and my ‘troop’ (my husband and 1.5 year old daughter) were greeted by the President of Rains County Historical Society, Mr. A.B. Godwin, and his wife who is also a member of the historical society, Mrs. Loretta Godwin; Rains County Judge, Mr. Wayne Wolfe; and Ms. Keeley Roan herself. Mr. Godwin led us first to The Luckett House. When he opened up the front door and ushered us into the house the feeling of stepping back in the era of 1900’s rushing in. And that was just the start.

See, learn, and experience The Emory Heritage Park yourself through my pictures, presented with some background information. And if you are interested in visiting the park, the next event will be “Back to School Bash”, August 4th, 2012. All buildings / structures will be opened for public.

For more information, contact: Ms. Keeley Roan, Director of Community Development of The City of Emory Development Corporation, 903-473-2465 x 112, email: keeley@emorytx.com, website: www.emorytx.com.

Read the article in County Line Magazine‘s August 2012 issue.

Mr. A.B. Godwin & Mrs. Loretta Godwin from Rains County Historical Society, Mr. Wayne Wolfe -Rains County Judge, and Ms. Keeley Roan -Director of Community Development of The City of Emory Development Corporation.

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