The Goode Garden

Edgewood, Historic Site, Nature, Photography, Spring

This is a photo essay of a garden and a house that has been capturing my eyes since I moved to Edgewood.  I finally get to know the owners and have a chance to be there and see it, up close and personal.  It’s the Goode’s Garden.

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The House

Located in the old downtown Edgewood, Texas, this house is known as “Bennett Joseph Carter” Home, built in 1912, adapting Queen Anne-style.  In 2010, it received the Official Historical Medallion from the State of Texas.  It is still in great living condition, owned, lived, and loved by the Goode family.

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Follow the Orange Brick Road

There is an open space between the main house and the garage. Almost all year round, that open space is  filled with burst of vibrant colors from flowers and there’s a glimpse of brown rocks.  I’ve been watching and admiring it for years.

SGoodes 3 |IBurke-1Being there in person, the warm brick walkways will guide one’s vision and way throughout the garden, to the flower beds in front and around the house.  Just follow the orange brick road.

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The backyard is airy and spacious, yet still a lot of things to enjoy.  A swing.  Yellow irises, by the vegetable garden.  Heirloom rose bush grows against the back fence.  Pea blossoms. An outhouse.  The azalea by the house.

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The sound of birds singing and fighting fill the air.  The red-breasted robins catching their dinner.  The deafening sound of the train passing by.

SGoodes 2 |IBurke-10

SGoodes 2 |IBurke-9

SGoodes 2 |IBurke-11

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The side porch provides the premier seats to enjoy the water-feature garden.  Hibiscus. Roses. Dianthus. Viola. Pansies. Azalea. African daisy.  Irises and many more.  Bees and butterflies. The sound of water fountain.

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Finally, there it is.  The part of the garden that I have been wanting to see.

 All photographs © 2015 Ine Burke | inegaleri.com

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135th Anniversary of Cheatham Memorial UMC’s Artwork

Edgewood, Festivals, Heritage Park, Memorial, My Graphic Work, MySpread

The Cheatham Memorial United Methodist Church in Edgewood, Tx., where I am a member, celebrated its 135th anniversary this year.  The theme “A Legacy of Faith” was chosen for this celebration. The past members and pastors were invited to rejoice with current members and we call it a Homecoming Celebration. I am honored to be one of the planning team members and help with the artwork / press release / publications. History background and the United Methodist Church’s logo (the flame and cross) were the concept used to do the artwork.  The works begun in February 2014. First, the anniversary logo was created and it depicts the front view of the church entryway to the sanctuary, with an open door. The cross and flame double-functions as the “T” in Cheatham. The Texas Historical Marker’s icon that the church received in 1982, was also included. The logo was used for any church communications regarding the event.

Print

The more colorful design was to be used as teaser, advertisements, invitations, reminders, etc., as the church built the momentum towards the big day in October 2014 (six months planning period). For this, the colorful play of the flame was applied. The initial design suggested that each flame would represent the ministries of the church.

135 A Flames Design

The church, which was born in 1879, has rich historical background. The congregations have been worshiping in 5 buildings in its 135 years course. The first two buildings served both Methodist church and Edgewood school. The church and school separated in 1897. The latter three church buildings were then incorporated into the design to commemorate this incredible heritage. The initial hand sketches are shown below. The top-left is the Church in the Wildwood (1897-1923) – the insert on top-right is the second version that was eventually being used in the artworks; the top-middle is the first church brick building (1923-1953); and the current church brick building (1953-now) is depicted in the middle. The bottom sketch is one of my draft sketches for logo idea.

135 B Church Original Sketches IB

These three-church sketches and the flame-and-cross icon were combined in the following works which were dispersed in the forms of postcards, bulletin, also electronic copies. During the discussions with the planning team, the idea “the church is the people” was suggested. I kept that in mind and the opportunity to express that came through the cover of A Legacy of Faith, an illustrated history book which was published to commemorate the anniversary. See it at A Legacy of Faith.

135 C Save the Date

135 C Invite Revised

135 C Postcard AOK

Facebook cover page.

135 FB Cover Page

Outdoor banners, 2×5 feet.

135 D BANNER OUTDOOR 2x5ft

Indoor banner, 3×8 feet.

135 D BANNER INDOOR 3x8ft

Bulletin covers and name tag for the two main events maintained the visual identity.

Name Tag Graphic CMUMC

135 D BULLETIN OCT18

135 D BULLETIN OCT19

A simpler black and white design, with orange flame, was applied for souvenirs such as cotton tote bag, decals. The color was inverted for the chosen black t-shirts.

135 E Canvas Bag135 E Decals We Belong

 

135 E T-Shirt Design

135 E T-Shirt Photo

© 2014 Ine Burke for Cheatham Memorial United Methodist Church, Edgewood, Texas.

Discover 300 Years of History in 35 Miles in Van Zandt County, Texas

Edgewood, Fruitvale, Grand Saline, Historic Parkway, Historic Site, MySpread, Texas, Travel, Upper East Texas, Wills Point

SELF-GUIDED TOUR OF THE DALLAS-SHREVEPORT HISTORIC PARKWAY IN VAN ZANDT COUNTY

BY INE BURKE for the County Line Magazine October 2012

The early native American Caddo established a trail from the Red River in Louisiana, as far west as the Pecos River to trade with the Jumano who inhabited West Texas. The trail later evolved into main route from the river port in Shreveport to North Texas. Now, historical societies in North Texas are working to research and preserve this historic road. In Van Zandt County, the work has been done by The Old Dallas – Shreveport Preservation Association, established in 1993, whose committees are also members of the county historical societies. Being the most advanced in the effort among other counties, the committee has put up road signs and historical markers along the path, enabling people to do a self-guided tour and discover at least 300 years of history along the 35-mile section of this county’s historical route.

The Old Dallas-Shreveport Road’s existence shaped the towns and communities in northeast Texas. The Texas and Pacific Railway was laid parallel to the Old Dallas-Shreveport Road about a mile northward in 1873. US Highway 80 was established later. It is also laid parallel to the historic road and was initially known as the “Dixie Overland Trail” in 1914. Its name became TX15 in 1919 and later US80 in 1926. The arrival of the railway and US80 ended the era of the Old Dallas-Shreveport Road as a major thoroughfare. See the history timeline of the old road at the end of this article.

THE TOUR

The Dallas-Shreveport Road Historic Parkway, Van Zandt County, Tx

Dallas-Shreveport Historic Parkway in Van Zandt County, Texas

Tour this historical parkway eastward point by point from Wills Point to Sand Flat in Van Zandt County, Texas.

1. The tour starts at the junction of HWY64 and CR3415 in Wills Point, just south of US80. The founders of Wills Point first settled here in 1847 and the County Seat War took place in 1877 along this part of the Dallas-Shreveport Road.

2. About 4 miles from Point 1 – New Hope Cemetery. A veteran of the Texas war for independence from Mexico, set aside some acres to encourage settlement around 1871. He and four confederate soldiers are among those who were buried here.

3. FM1504 and CR3215. A cotton gin is believed to have been located near this crossroads. About 450 yards from the intersection, where the road bends right, a freight company stop used to operate in the mid 1800’s.

4. From CR3215 to CR3216, 300 yards on left. Slaughter School, built in 1888, fulfilled the need for a school due to the population growth along the road. It was later consolidated with the Edgewood school district. Go back to CR3215.

5. Barren Ridge. Continue to CR3218, cross FM859 to CR3118, turn right to CR3105, pass CR3109. This is where the Black Land Prairie meets the Post Oak Savannah, thus name ‘Edgewood’. Barren Ridge used to be a savannah. The cultivation brought by the settlers is the reason why the trees are there now. A post office and stage stop was once located here from 1850 to 1857. The citizens of Canton once traveled 8 miles here for their mail.

Crooked Creek, Van Zandt County, Tx

Between Point 5-6: Crooked Creek, Van Zandt County, Tx

Between 5-6. Continue through a grove where the canopy of trees thickens. Sunken trails on either side of the road were the original Dallas-Shreveport road bed. From an unguarded wooden bridge, the steep Crooked Creek’s bank is noticeable. Where the road bends right, the original trail bends away into private lands towards Point 7.

6. A mile from the bridge, stands a tree that grows almost in the middle of the road. Back in the 1800’s, surveyors often used a tree on the land they surveyed as the benchmark, and called this tree the witness tree. This is one of them.

7. To TX19 and go north. The location of Point 7 is on private property, approximately across CR3108, on right. It’s a crossing with deep vertical banks near Mill Creek, and is part of the old Caddo trail. The early pioneers who traveled this road called it Devil’s Gap due to raids by Kiowa and other native American tribes who used this part of the trail as an attack point. Stop at the Mill Creek bridge (past Point 8), to visualize the condition.

8. From TX19 turn right to CR1117. About 0.5 miles down the road, on the left across from a private mailbox, there’s a steel sign post, where Father Jose Calahorra Historical Marker once was. The marker was stolen after its dedication in 2009. It is such a shame, considering that it’s the oldest historical facts found so far related to this part of the road. This is where the Caddo trail intersected Tawakoni trail that went from the Sabine River in the north to Nacogdoches in the south. The entourage of Father Jose Calahorra, a well-respected Spanish missionary in Texas, was greeted here and then escorted by the Tawakoni to their village on the Sabine River in 1760, 1761, and 1764.

9. Cherokee Survey Line, dated 1841, crosses the CR1117 1 mile down the road from Point 8.

10. About 4.5 miles from Point 8, on CR1817, on left. An effort to colonize an area of North Central Texas and settle 500 families in 5 years was led by Charles Mercer in 1844. The boundaries were Palestine and Waco on the south, the Brazos River on the west, McKinney area on the north, and this point on the east. Descendants of Mercer’s colony settlers still reside in Texas.

Point 8: Father Jose Calahorra Historical Marker Dedication

Point 8: Father Jose Calahorra Historical Marker Dedication

11. Turn right to CR1818. The marker is in the Creagleville Cemetery. The Dallas-Shreveport Road went through Creagleville, a community named after Henry Creagle, a German native who settled in Van Zandt County in 1847.The agricultural community once had a school, church, cotton gin, gristmill, and cemetery. Only the cemetery remains today.

12. Straight ahead to CR1820, to the intersection with CR1824, on left. During the Civil War, people from the southeast fled west and formed a community here around 1863, on land where the property owners were away at war. Poles were used to build homes, thus Poletown. After the war, arrangements were made for them to purchase land or become tenant farmers. Jacob C. Rhodes’ land in Poletown was designated as a new town, Rhodesburg, in 1895. Rhodes was a member of the Populist Party, who then changed to and organized the Socialist Party of Texas. For over a decade the town accommodated the Socialist Party’s movement.

13. Continue to CR1823/W Patterson St. Take a glance at Morton Salt Company Lake, on right, a private man-made lake built by B.W. Carrington & Company in 1911 for the salt plant use.

14. Continue east on Hwy17 to the meeting point with Hwy110. The original road goes straight through private lands and picks up again at Point 18.Take left on Hwy110/FM17.  An old cotton gin sits on the left. Continue through historic downtown Grand Saline to the intersection with US80.

15. Across the junction of Hwy110/FM17 and US80, on left – The Salt Palace is a tiny building made of pure salt that has been rebuilt three times since its debut in 1936 due to deterioration caused by weather. Inside, it exhibits the salt industry and history of Grand Saline. Wiley H. Post, one of world’s greatest pioneer aviators who is a native son of Van Zandt County, is also remembered here.

Point 14: 1890 Coton Gin, Grand Saline, Tx

Point 14: 1890 Coton Gin, Grand Saline, Tx

16. Continue 0.5 mile east on US80, take right to FM857. Kleer Park is located on the left. During the Civil War, the demand for salt increased significantly to preserve food and hides. Salt workers were exempted from army service. The salt mine in Grand Saline was once named Kleer Mine. It was operated by the Confederacy during the war.

17. Salt Flat, Marsh, and Birds Sanctuary on FM857, by the first concrete bridge. Take a peek at the white surface of one of the largest and purest salt domes in the country. Its depth is unknown and its supply of the valuable mineral is estimated to last 20,000 years. The Cherokee were the first to obtain salt from here in the early 1800’s. It is now designated as a bird sanctuary.

18. Jordan’s Saline and the site of the first courthouse, by the second bridge, across CR1701. It’s the oldest community in Van Zandt County, established by John Jordan in 1844, even before the county was formed in 1848. It was once the County Seat before being moved to Canton in 1850. By 1860 it had a thriving salt industry. The community diminished after the railroad arrived in 1873 and the townsite was relocated one mile north and named Grand Saline.

19. Continue 2.8 miles, to the junction of FM1255 (Crockett’s Bluff Road) and FM857, on Sand Flat Cemetery property. It’s a small community that sprung up along the historic road in the 1850’s. It was first known as Chrestman, then Sand Flat, and later “Fulton” when a post office was in operation from 1900-1905. The community retained the name Sand Flat.

20. Continue on FM 857 to Providence, another community that grew along the road in the 1850’s. It’s the eastern end of the historic parkway in Van Zandt County. Providence Cemetery, established in 1873, is just past the Smith County line. Spanish explorer, Pedro Vial may have used part of this road in 1788. End of the tour. Continue to the intersection with FM1253, go north 3.4 miles to get to US80.

Beyond Van Zandt County to the east, the route resumes about 3.5 miles south on FM1253 from Providence, take CR452 on left. From Wills Point to the west, the route goes northwest towards Rockwall, then to downtown Dallas (Bird’s Fort by Trinity River) – also recognized as the historical Central National Road of the Republic of Texas; then to Arlington and end at Fort Worth. Dallas was actually built on the old Caddo trade trail. ~

The article was published in the County Line Magazine: http://www.countylinemagazine.com/October-2012/Discover-300/

History Timeline of the Dallas - Shreveport Road

History Timeline of the Dallas – Shreveport Road

Wills Point Depot Museum

Old Downtown, Photography, Wills Point

Wills Point, Texas.

Wills Point Depot Museum is a historical museum that houses a collection of artifacts, documents, and photos from the city’s old businesses, institutions, households, agricultural and railroad industries. The exhibits are mostly donated by Wills Point residents and the museum is maintained and operated by Wills Point Historical Society. The brick building itself was not the first depot, or train station, that operated in Wills Point. It was built in 1927. The main entrance of the museum leads to what used to be the waiting room.

The main wall in the room is the eye-catcher. It is covered by old business signs that used to flourish in Wills Point and a painting in the middle. Haberdasher, millinery, how often do we hear or see these words nowadays? Look closely and notice that those are actually painted on one piece of huge cloth that used to be the theatre backdrop in the 1926 Majestic Theatre across the railroad. What used to be the depot’s restroom area on the east side, now hosts artifacts from Wills Point schools. The original ticket-selling booth and depot’s office on the west side, holds various memorabilia such as old cashier machines, typewriters, and many more. In the further west rooms, agricultural and medical artifacts are exhibited. Pictures from the old “golden days” are displayed in the Pictorial Room. Centennial Quilts, vintage clothes, and turn of the century furniture, are the main attraction in the Quilt Room.

The museum is currently open by appointment only. It is located at 210 W. South Commerce St (on US HWY 80), Wills Point, Texas 75169. For enquiry and appointment call Pat Mitchell, (903) 873-4568.

For those who like to flick through history of the city and the county, several copies of Van Zandt County Genealogy Publications and 1954 Wills Point Chronicle (hardbound) are available for browsing at the museum. Or, travel two blocks north from the Depot Museum to West High Street, between 5th and 4th Streets, to gain Wills Point’s history in a glance through six panels of wall murals. These murals were lovingly and painstakingly created with inputs from a number of citizens and painted by a local artist, Dan Fogel.

Photos © Ine Burke / Inegaleri 2013

Published in County Line Magazine July/August 2013 issue.

Battle of the Neches Memorial 33

The Battle of the Neches Memorial 2012

Historic Site, Memorial, Nature, Photography, Redland, Summer, Upper East Texas

Battle of the Neches Memorial Ceremony, July 14th, 2012

Excerpted from “Remembering the Battle of the Neches, Cherokee Chief Bowles, Other Victims” by Shea Gilchrist, published in County Line Magazine, July 2012 issue, page 16:

“… Texas Cherokee and 12 associated tribal bands under the leadership of Chief John ‘Duwa ‘li’ Bowles, Chief Big Mush, and six other tribal chiefs were slain July 16, 1839. The massacre by the Republic of Texas Army, under the direction of President Mirabeau Lamar, took the lives of many innocent men, women, and children along with the burning of a Delaware village. The associated Indian tribal bands were Cherokee, Shawnee, Delaware, Kickapoo, Quapaw, Choctaw, Biloxi, Ioni, Alabama, Coushatta, Caddo of the Neches, Tahocullake, Mataquo and possibly other groups.

In 1936, the State of Texas erected a marker to honor Chief Bowles on the land. It is believed that Bowles died 20 feet in proximity to the marker. When visiting the land, there is a definite feeling of peace, the mystical, and the sacred.

… The most important event they hold on the land each year is the Battle of the Neches memorial ceremony held this year on July 14th.”

The land and historical marker is located at Redland, from Hwy 64 between Edom and Tyler take CR 4923, keep left on a split, keep going and look for the signs “Chief Bowles Memorial”.

Visit their website at www.aics1839.com.

Battle of the Neches Memorial 3

Battle of the Neches Memorial 9

Battle of the Neches Memorial 17

Battle of the Neches Memorial 30

Battle of the Neches Memorial Day 36 - Double Rainbows at the Site 1