Under the Canopy of Oaks and Gums

Black and White, Countryscape, Edgewood, Fine art photography, Nature, Photography, Upper East Texas

My second issue of photo essay periodicals is published! It is called “Under the Canopy of Oaks and Gums – Portrait of a County Road”, in the format of a 40-page magazine with premium papers fit to showcase photography works.  They are currently available at 211 Art Gallery and will also be brought to the Edgewood Heritage Festival on November 11, 2017.

Excerpt

Broadening the way of seeing is exactly what this photography work sets out to do. Subjects found along a typical county road in East Texas were portrayed in “spotlights”.

Preview and purchase

 

Book details

  • Size US Letter, 8.5×11 in, 22×28 cm, 40 Pages, premium paper
  • ISBN: Softcover – 9781389545351

To see all issues go to: BOOKS

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

©Ine Burke | inegaleri.com

Advertisements

Supermoon and the Parade

Edgewood, Fall, Old Downtown, Photography, Skyscape, Upper East Texas

This full moon will be not only the closest and brightest supermoon of 2016 but also the largest since 1948, Bob Berman, an astronomer at the Slooh Community Observatory, told Space.com. What’s more, the full moon won’t come this close to Earth again until Nov. 25, 2034.” – Source

I captured the supermoon on November 14th, 2016, when it was just risen about 6.40PM (Central Time).  It was bright, yellow and big. Our tree line was all we have to directly compare and showcase how big the moon was and that was not good enough. The next several nights, the moon was just as gorgeous as when it was on its peak. One of those nights, we drove through the old downtown Edgewood and witnessed the moon rising against the houses and buildings. It made a huge difference. The moon looked much larger. It was humongous! Of course, I didn’t have my camera then and the moon has passed its peak. But this gave me an idea to make my version of supermoon shot.

I took a picture of the Christmas Parade in downtown Edgewood in 2012. I have this picture in my third photobook, The Dancing Trees. I have always loved this picture – silhouette of horse riders in lighted downtown Edgewood on sunset. I thought it would be nice to superimpose this photo with the big yellow moon I took on November 14th, 2016. And here it is, my version of supermoon 2016 shot.

supermoon-2016-in-edgewood-s

Superimposed photo of the November 2016 supermoon and Edgewood Christmas Parade 2012

supermoon-161114-170_0333_hdr-edit

Supermoon November 2016 in Edgewood, Tx. Taken with 400mm, no cropping.

 

supermoon-2016-161114-170_0306

Yellow Supermoon, November 2016

 

© Ine Burke | inegaleri.com

Spring in Van Zandt County, Texas

Canton, Countryscape, Edgewood, Fruitvale, Grand Saline, Heritage Park, Nature, Redland, Spring, Travel, Upper East Texas, Wills Point

Spring sightings from various places in Van Zandt County, Texas – March/April 2016

Pear Blosom & Cows-160310-159_0006

Pear blossom and contented cows – Edgewood, Tx

VZC Spring-160312-159_0059

A bird perching on a blossoming sassafras tree – Edgewood, Tx

VZC Spring-160312-L1012789

Red bud trees by the railway – Fruitvale, Tx

VZC Spring-160312-L1012790_Edit

Grand Saline Library – Grand Saline, Tx

VZC Spring-160315-159_0075

Peach blossoms at a Peach Farm and Old Fashioned Ice Cream – Hwy 19, Edgewood, Tx

VZC Spring-160315-159_0105

Hickenbach Texas a.k.a Jones Junction – US 80 & TX 19, Edgewood, Tx

VZC Spring-160319-160_0009

Scott Cabin at the Heritage Park Museum of East Texas – Edgewood, Tx

VZC Spring-160329-162_0006

A field of purple and gold by Side Pea Farm – Canton, Tx

VZC Spring-160331-L1013017

Blooming azaleas – Canton, Tx

VZC Spring-160331-L1013031

Canton Lake – Canton, Tx

VZC Spring-160331-L1013047

Picnic Area on Hwy 64 – Canton, Tx

VZC Spring-160402-163_0040

Indian Paintbrush and Crimson Clover on Hwy 64 – Redland, Tx

VZC Spring-160402-163_0036

Crimson Clover – Redland, Tx

VZC Spring-160408-163_0058

Indian paintbrush across the Tawakoni Spillway – Wills Point, Tx

VZC Spring-160408-L1013220

Tawakoni Spillway Levee – Wills Point, Tx

VZC Spring-160408-L1013231

Roses by the 1848 Will’s Cabin – Wills Point, Tx

All rights reserved © Ine Burke | inegaleri.com

The Best Kept Secret of East Texas

Beyond, Historic Parkway, Nature, Photography, Spring, Travel, Upper East Texas
Mrs. Lee’s Daffodil Garden

Around 1954, over 1,000 acres of land near Gladewater, Texas, was transformed by the land lady, Mrs. Helen Lee, into a secret garden.  Out of her love to the land, she converted what used to be a gravel pits into a daffodil retreat with a 5-acre lake and a 3-acre pond, called Lake Josephine – named after her mother.  It took an entire boxcar load of daffodil bulbs from Holland and about 40 workers to make this daffodil garden.  It is considered the best kept secret in East Texas.  A replica of pioneer style log cabin was added to the site in 1954 overlooking Lake Josephine as a quiet place to enjoy the beauty of the land and its wildlife. Following her passing in 1984, at her request, the park has been opened to the public in spring.

Learn more about the park at http://www.daffodilgarden.com/daffodils_home.htm

Mrs Lee Daffodil-160227-L1012727

Mrs Lee Daffodil-160227-158_0015

Mrs Lee Daffodil-160227-158_0018

Mrs Lee Daffodil-160227-158_0026

Mrs Lee Daffodil-160227-L1012738

Mrs Lee Daffodil-160227-158_0024

Mrs Lee Daffodil-160227-158_0038

 

Lake Josephine and Log Cabin Site

Mrs Lee Daffodil-160227-L1012744

Mrs Lee Daffodil-160227-158_0039

Mrs Lee Daffodil-160227-158_0042

Mrs Lee Daffodil-160227-L1012746 Mrs Lee Daffodil-160227-L1012750 Mrs Lee Daffodil-160227-L1012755 Mrs Lee Daffodil-160227-L1012753

Mrs Lee Daffodil-160227-158_0047 Mrs Lee Daffodil-160227-158_0053

Photographs © Ine Burke | inegaleri.com

Either Side of the Bridge

Black and White, Edgewood, Fruitvale, Nature, Photography, Upper East Texas, Winter

Standing on the 2-year-old concrete bridge, these are what you will see in winter.  Tangled vines, limbs, and branches. And barren trees. The bridge is one of many that crosses over the Mill Creek in Van Zandt County, Tx.  This particular one is connecting Edgewood and Fruitvale.

BW CR by Ine Burke 2015-1

Fruitvale < | > Edgewood

~

BW CR by Ine Burke 2015-2Edgewood < | > Fruitvale

~

BW CR by Ine Burke 2015-4From the bridge, the county road meanders towards Hwy 19, Edgewood

~

Photographs © 2015 Ine Burke | inegaleri.com

Winter on the Edge of the Piney Woods

Countryscape, Edgewood, Nature, Photography, Upper East Texas, Winter

A triptych (3 panels) approach is used to present this common scenery of branches and limbs in a winter in East Texas. Old wet plate and eroded film look were applied.  Just another play on “On the Edge of the Piney Woods” photo series.On the Edge of the Piney Woods Triptych© 2015 Ine Burke | inegaleri.com

Ben Wheeler Book Fair 2014

Ben Wheeler, Book Fair, Fall, Old Downtown, Photography, Upper East Texas

The annual Ben Wheeler Book Fair features about 25 East Texas authors. Works span genres including children’s books, Christian fiction, horror, humor, mystery, poetry, romance, and young adult fiction. Nonfiction authors include biography, children’s advocacy, memoir, music and culture, photography, and self help. Authors are screened to ensure quality and visitors have opportunity for one-on-one time with the authors. The third book fair was held on November 29th, 2014, in the restored Old Elwood Schoolhouse in downtown Ben Wheeler, Tx., sharing space with the Ben Wheeler Children’s Library.

I have been part of this book fair since it started in 2012. This year I brought my photography books “On the Edge of the Piney Woods”, “My Northeast Texas”, “The Dancing Trees”, and “A Legacy of Faith,”  along with notecards and photography works. I had a great time meeting and visiting with fellow authors and visitors.

Follow the event on facebook at www.facebook.com/pages/Ben-Wheeler-Book-Fair.

Photographs by Ine Burke, 2014

38th Annual Edgewood Heritage Festival’s Artwork

Edgewood, Festivals, Heritage Park, My Graphic Work, MySpread, Travel, Upper East Texas

Once again, I had the honor to do the branding for the 38th Annual Edgewood Heritage Festival, in Edgewood, Tx.  From Facebook cover page, rack card, window flyer, print and electronic advertisement for several publications, to t-shirt and poster. The Blacksmith Shop was chosen as the annual collectible ornament so it is used in the artworks.

 

To see last year’s visual identity, go to: https://inegaleri.com/2013/08/23/37th-edgewood-heritage-festival-van-zandt-county-texas/

Ben Wheeler Feral Hog Festival 2014

Ben Wheeler, Fall, Festivals, Old Downtown, Photography, Travel, Upper East Texas

Photos from the annual Ben Wheeler Feral Hog Festival 2014, October 25th, featuring the Hog Parade, Willie Peden Syrup Mill, and Moore’s Store at Ben Wheeler, Texas.

Photographs ©2014 Ine Burke

“No-Mean Feet” – Wine bottle label design for Crooked Creek Vineyards

Countryscape, Edgewood, My Graphic Work, MySpread, Upper East Texas

Wine bottle label design for Crooked Creek Vineyards‘ “No-Mean Feet” 2013 Lenoir.

The background is a cut-out rendition from photograph of pine trees that grow by a pond within the property of the vineyard.

2013 Wine Label CC3 2013 Wine Label CC3Back

Here’s how they look on the bottles (with the vineyard at the background):

© 2014 Ine Burke

 

Fiery Sunrise on the Edge of the Piney Woods

Countryscape, Edgewood, Nature, Photography, Skyscape, Upper East Texas, Winter

I’ve been observing and preserving the beauty of East Texas sky since I moved here, in Edgewood, in 2006. In 2012, I self-published my photography book, On the Edge of the Piney Woods, compiling the photographs of ever-changing Texas sky and the land’s natural beauty in four seasons. The sky and the land don’t stop amaze me with their ever-changing beauty and surprises, so I keep taking photographs of the same subjects. Like these views of one fiery sunrise in early winter in December 2013. The ray of golden sunlight caught my eyes through the kitchen window, as always, notifying me that a glorious scene was going to play out there in a few seconds. Without delay, I grabbed my camera and got out there in a crisp morning to capture it.

SKY-Sunrise December 2013-1 SKY-Sunrise December 2013-2 SKY-Sunrise December 2013-3

© Ine Burke 2014 / inegaleri.com 2014

Blurb Preview of the book, On the Edge of the Piney Woods:

Marshall Wonderland of Lights

Architecture, Festivals, Historic Site, Main Street City Texas, Marshall, Old Downtown, Photography, Texas, Travel, Upper East Texas, Winter

light  |līt|
noun
1| the natural agent that stimulates sight and makes things visible

2| an area of something that is brighter or paler than its surroundings

*

This is my take on the Marshall Wonderland of Lights Festival, in Marshall, Texas, December 2013.

Marshall Wonderland of Lights

The Historic Harrison County Courthouse, Texas, the center stage of the festival.

*

Marshall Wonderland of Lights

The Courthouse 2

*

Marshall Wonderland of Lights

The Courthouse 3 – taken from the Horse Carriage Ride, from southwest of the Peter Whetstone Square

*

Marshall Wonderland of Lights

The Courthouse viewed from around Peter Whetstone Square – 1

*

Marshall Wonderland of Lights

The Courthouse viewed from around Peter Whetstone Square – 2

*

Marshall Wonderland of Lights

The Courthouse viewed from around Peter Whetstone Square – 3

*

Marshall Wonderland of Lights

The Courthouse viewed from around Peter Whetstone Square – 4

*

Marshall Wonderland of Lights

The Horse Carriage Ride along North Washington Avenue

*

Marshall Wonderland of Lights

The Courthouse viewed from North Washington Avenue and East Austin Street – 1

*

Marshall Wonderland of Lights

The Courthouse viewed from North Washington Avenue and East Austin Street – 2

*

Marshall Wonderland of Lights

Lights from vendor and ticket booths opposite the Telegraph Park -1

*

Marshall Wonderland of Lights

Lights from vendor and ticket booths opposite the Telegraph Park -2

*

© Ine Burke 2014

Link to Marshall Wonderland of Lights Festival.

Ben Wheeler Book Fair Graphic Work

Ben Wheeler, Book Fair, My Graphic Work, MySpread, Upper East Texas

I took a design graphic work challenge for the 2nd Annual Ben Wheeler Book Fair, which I will be part of, and the organizer put it to use in the form of flyer and printed advertisement in County Line Magazine.

BW Book Fair Flyer2R-Small

BW Flyer in CLM2013

Discover 300 Years of History in 35 Miles in Van Zandt County, Texas

Edgewood, Fruitvale, Grand Saline, Historic Parkway, Historic Site, MySpread, Texas, Travel, Upper East Texas, Wills Point

SELF-GUIDED TOUR OF THE DALLAS-SHREVEPORT HISTORIC PARKWAY IN VAN ZANDT COUNTY

BY INE BURKE for the County Line Magazine October 2012

The early native American Caddo established a trail from the Red River in Louisiana, as far west as the Pecos River to trade with the Jumano who inhabited West Texas. The trail later evolved into main route from the river port in Shreveport to North Texas. Now, historical societies in North Texas are working to research and preserve this historic road. In Van Zandt County, the work has been done by The Old Dallas – Shreveport Preservation Association, established in 1993, whose committees are also members of the county historical societies. Being the most advanced in the effort among other counties, the committee has put up road signs and historical markers along the path, enabling people to do a self-guided tour and discover at least 300 years of history along the 35-mile section of this county’s historical route.

The Old Dallas-Shreveport Road’s existence shaped the towns and communities in northeast Texas. The Texas and Pacific Railway was laid parallel to the Old Dallas-Shreveport Road about a mile northward in 1873. US Highway 80 was established later. It is also laid parallel to the historic road and was initially known as the “Dixie Overland Trail” in 1914. Its name became TX15 in 1919 and later US80 in 1926. The arrival of the railway and US80 ended the era of the Old Dallas-Shreveport Road as a major thoroughfare. See the history timeline of the old road at the end of this article.

THE TOUR

The Dallas-Shreveport Road Historic Parkway, Van Zandt County, Tx

Dallas-Shreveport Historic Parkway in Van Zandt County, Texas

Tour this historical parkway eastward point by point from Wills Point to Sand Flat in Van Zandt County, Texas.

1. The tour starts at the junction of HWY64 and CR3415 in Wills Point, just south of US80. The founders of Wills Point first settled here in 1847 and the County Seat War took place in 1877 along this part of the Dallas-Shreveport Road.

2. About 4 miles from Point 1 – New Hope Cemetery. A veteran of the Texas war for independence from Mexico, set aside some acres to encourage settlement around 1871. He and four confederate soldiers are among those who were buried here.

3. FM1504 and CR3215. A cotton gin is believed to have been located near this crossroads. About 450 yards from the intersection, where the road bends right, a freight company stop used to operate in the mid 1800’s.

4. From CR3215 to CR3216, 300 yards on left. Slaughter School, built in 1888, fulfilled the need for a school due to the population growth along the road. It was later consolidated with the Edgewood school district. Go back to CR3215.

5. Barren Ridge. Continue to CR3218, cross FM859 to CR3118, turn right to CR3105, pass CR3109. This is where the Black Land Prairie meets the Post Oak Savannah, thus name ‘Edgewood’. Barren Ridge used to be a savannah. The cultivation brought by the settlers is the reason why the trees are there now. A post office and stage stop was once located here from 1850 to 1857. The citizens of Canton once traveled 8 miles here for their mail.

Crooked Creek, Van Zandt County, Tx

Between Point 5-6: Crooked Creek, Van Zandt County, Tx

Between 5-6. Continue through a grove where the canopy of trees thickens. Sunken trails on either side of the road were the original Dallas-Shreveport road bed. From an unguarded wooden bridge, the steep Crooked Creek’s bank is noticeable. Where the road bends right, the original trail bends away into private lands towards Point 7.

6. A mile from the bridge, stands a tree that grows almost in the middle of the road. Back in the 1800’s, surveyors often used a tree on the land they surveyed as the benchmark, and called this tree the witness tree. This is one of them.

7. To TX19 and go north. The location of Point 7 is on private property, approximately across CR3108, on right. It’s a crossing with deep vertical banks near Mill Creek, and is part of the old Caddo trail. The early pioneers who traveled this road called it Devil’s Gap due to raids by Kiowa and other native American tribes who used this part of the trail as an attack point. Stop at the Mill Creek bridge (past Point 8), to visualize the condition.

8. From TX19 turn right to CR1117. About 0.5 miles down the road, on the left across from a private mailbox, there’s a steel sign post, where Father Jose Calahorra Historical Marker once was. The marker was stolen after its dedication in 2009. It is such a shame, considering that it’s the oldest historical facts found so far related to this part of the road. This is where the Caddo trail intersected Tawakoni trail that went from the Sabine River in the north to Nacogdoches in the south. The entourage of Father Jose Calahorra, a well-respected Spanish missionary in Texas, was greeted here and then escorted by the Tawakoni to their village on the Sabine River in 1760, 1761, and 1764.

9. Cherokee Survey Line, dated 1841, crosses the CR1117 1 mile down the road from Point 8.

10. About 4.5 miles from Point 8, on CR1817, on left. An effort to colonize an area of North Central Texas and settle 500 families in 5 years was led by Charles Mercer in 1844. The boundaries were Palestine and Waco on the south, the Brazos River on the west, McKinney area on the north, and this point on the east. Descendants of Mercer’s colony settlers still reside in Texas.

Point 8: Father Jose Calahorra Historical Marker Dedication

Point 8: Father Jose Calahorra Historical Marker Dedication

11. Turn right to CR1818. The marker is in the Creagleville Cemetery. The Dallas-Shreveport Road went through Creagleville, a community named after Henry Creagle, a German native who settled in Van Zandt County in 1847.The agricultural community once had a school, church, cotton gin, gristmill, and cemetery. Only the cemetery remains today.

12. Straight ahead to CR1820, to the intersection with CR1824, on left. During the Civil War, people from the southeast fled west and formed a community here around 1863, on land where the property owners were away at war. Poles were used to build homes, thus Poletown. After the war, arrangements were made for them to purchase land or become tenant farmers. Jacob C. Rhodes’ land in Poletown was designated as a new town, Rhodesburg, in 1895. Rhodes was a member of the Populist Party, who then changed to and organized the Socialist Party of Texas. For over a decade the town accommodated the Socialist Party’s movement.

13. Continue to CR1823/W Patterson St. Take a glance at Morton Salt Company Lake, on right, a private man-made lake built by B.W. Carrington & Company in 1911 for the salt plant use.

14. Continue east on Hwy17 to the meeting point with Hwy110. The original road goes straight through private lands and picks up again at Point 18.Take left on Hwy110/FM17.  An old cotton gin sits on the left. Continue through historic downtown Grand Saline to the intersection with US80.

15. Across the junction of Hwy110/FM17 and US80, on left – The Salt Palace is a tiny building made of pure salt that has been rebuilt three times since its debut in 1936 due to deterioration caused by weather. Inside, it exhibits the salt industry and history of Grand Saline. Wiley H. Post, one of world’s greatest pioneer aviators who is a native son of Van Zandt County, is also remembered here.

Point 14: 1890 Coton Gin, Grand Saline, Tx

Point 14: 1890 Coton Gin, Grand Saline, Tx

16. Continue 0.5 mile east on US80, take right to FM857. Kleer Park is located on the left. During the Civil War, the demand for salt increased significantly to preserve food and hides. Salt workers were exempted from army service. The salt mine in Grand Saline was once named Kleer Mine. It was operated by the Confederacy during the war.

17. Salt Flat, Marsh, and Birds Sanctuary on FM857, by the first concrete bridge. Take a peek at the white surface of one of the largest and purest salt domes in the country. Its depth is unknown and its supply of the valuable mineral is estimated to last 20,000 years. The Cherokee were the first to obtain salt from here in the early 1800’s. It is now designated as a bird sanctuary.

18. Jordan’s Saline and the site of the first courthouse, by the second bridge, across CR1701. It’s the oldest community in Van Zandt County, established by John Jordan in 1844, even before the county was formed in 1848. It was once the County Seat before being moved to Canton in 1850. By 1860 it had a thriving salt industry. The community diminished after the railroad arrived in 1873 and the townsite was relocated one mile north and named Grand Saline.

19. Continue 2.8 miles, to the junction of FM1255 (Crockett’s Bluff Road) and FM857, on Sand Flat Cemetery property. It’s a small community that sprung up along the historic road in the 1850’s. It was first known as Chrestman, then Sand Flat, and later “Fulton” when a post office was in operation from 1900-1905. The community retained the name Sand Flat.

20. Continue on FM 857 to Providence, another community that grew along the road in the 1850’s. It’s the eastern end of the historic parkway in Van Zandt County. Providence Cemetery, established in 1873, is just past the Smith County line. Spanish explorer, Pedro Vial may have used part of this road in 1788. End of the tour. Continue to the intersection with FM1253, go north 3.4 miles to get to US80.

Beyond Van Zandt County to the east, the route resumes about 3.5 miles south on FM1253 from Providence, take CR452 on left. From Wills Point to the west, the route goes northwest towards Rockwall, then to downtown Dallas (Bird’s Fort by Trinity River) – also recognized as the historical Central National Road of the Republic of Texas; then to Arlington and end at Fort Worth. Dallas was actually built on the old Caddo trade trail. ~

The article was published in the County Line Magazine: http://www.countylinemagazine.com/October-2012/Discover-300/

History Timeline of the Dallas - Shreveport Road

History Timeline of the Dallas – Shreveport Road

The 82nd Athens Old Fiddlers Reunion 2013

Athens, Festivals, Old Downtown, Photography, Spring, Upper East Texas

June 1st, 2013 – Athens, Texas

The state’s longest running contest was held at the square of old downtown Athens, Texas, on the last day of May and first day of June, this year.

I don’t know enough about fiddlers and fiddling, but I can feel the old Texas atmosphere around the square by listening to the tunes played and sung.

The tunes date back older than the reunion itself, I heard.

Young and seniors fiddled in harmony. Ladies played bingo. Spouse guarded the instruments. Toddler watched in the shade of a big ol’ oak tree.

The youth, 18 years and under, practiced, waited, watched, competed.

Concession booths stood by.

Apple Blossom. Brilliancy.

The spectators swayed.

Kids played puddle. Teens wandered around.

© Photographs by Ine Burke / Inegaleri.com 2013

Stroll along a Texas Main Street City: Mineola

Architecture, Historic Site, Main Street City Texas, Mineola, Old Downtown, Upper East Texas

Mineola, which site is located at the center of East Texas timber belt, is a town that sprung up in 1873 with the construction of the southern transcontinental railroad. The train station in Mineola today is a designated daily stop, served by the national railroad passenger system’s Amtrak Texas Eagle which connects Chicago (Illinois), St. Louis (Missouri), and Los Angeles (California). Mineola is a Texas and National Main Street City. Its historic downtown has been revitalized and holds many attractive community events all year round. An acoustic music jam is held every third Saturday by the railroad, along the streets and in the alleys downtown.

These photos are taken from S Johnson Street and Commerce Street, Mineola, Texas. May 2013.

Photographs ©INEGALERI.COM 2013

All American Affair

Black and White, Canton, Festivals, Photography, Upper East Texas

It’s an American affair. Classic American car show, American food vendor, and American band performance. All in one event in Canton, Texas, last weekend.

Photographs ©INEGALERI.COM 2013

Life Festival organized by Driven Life Church, at the First Monday Ground, Canton, Texas. I was informed that the band is Covey Thedford and the Broken Soul.

 

County Line Magazine on the other Side of the World – by Ine Burke

Beyond, Beyond Upper East Texas, My Graphic Work, MySpread, Travel, Upper East Texas
CLM in INDONESIA 1

County Line Magazine in Indonesia – Page 1/3

CLM in Indonesia 2

County Line Magazine in Indonesia – Page 2/3

County Line Magazine in Indonesia - Page 3/3

County Line Magazine in Indonesia – Page 3/3

A Wedding in Fruitvale, Texas

Black and White, Family Affair, Fruitvale, Photography, Upper East Texas, Way of Life, Wedding

Fruitvale, Texas – Spring 2012

In a little tiny corner of this gargantuan state, the corner some call North Texas, Northeast Texas, East Texas, or Upper East Side of Texas, about a mile east of the intersection between two important highways, US Highway 80 and Texas Highway 19, there’s a tiny city called Fruitvale. It’s an ordinary place, at first sight. Just two highways slicing through small towns, pastures, ranches, quiet communities, bumpy county roads. Trains towing industrial cars. There is no grand canyon or enormous rock monuments. No wide rivers with magnificent old steel bridges. There are no bustling boulevards, nor arrondissement. No modern architectural marvels. No central park dotted with art installations.

It is a community that came into being with the arrival of the Texas and Pacific Railroad in 1873. The town site was initially a railroad switch, which is where the rail track diverges from the main track into a short branch or spur. The switch was called Bolton Switch. One of its early endeavors was cord wood and cross ties, cut from local timber, and used in the construction of the rail lines. In 1903 another industry was thriving and gave the town its current name. About 20,000 fruit trees had been planted and even more in the following years. Berries and other vegetables such as potatos and corn were also blossoming. The local fruit growers filed petition to change the town name to Fruitvale and, obviously, it was granted.

My fellow Texans who live here are very proud of their heritage and celebrate that with a plethora of festivals, parades, rodeos, fairs, barbecues, hoe downs, and other friendly get-to-gathers. When they aren’t having a festival of one kind or another, they are getting together to trade or to swap stuff. They are artists and artisans. They make horseshoes into hat racks. Wine bottles into wind chimes. Oil barrels into barbecue pits. The sheet metal from junked automobiles can become a pink elephant yard ornament or a huge lone star hanging over a gateway to a cattle ranch.

And a life celebration, such as wedding, is observed in an honest, free of pretense, and genuine way of their everyday life.

(Part of the essay was quoted from My Northeast Texas)

Edgewood Christmas Parade

Edgewood, Festivals, Old Downtown, Photography, Upper East Texas, Winter

12.12.12

Emory Heritage Park

Architecture, Emory, Heritage Park, My Graphic Work, MySpread, Upper East Texas

STEP BACK IN TIME TO 1900’s RAINS COUNTY, TEXAS

Earlier in the month I have the honor of exploring and taking photographs of the Emory Heritage Park, in Emory, Rains County, Texas. I first contacted Ms. Keeley Roan, the Director of Community Development of The City of Emory Development Corporation and she organized the meeting. On the beautiful day of shooting, I and my ‘troop’ (my husband and 1.5 year old daughter) were greeted by the President of Rains County Historical Society, Mr. A.B. Godwin, and his wife who is also a member of the historical society, Mrs. Loretta Godwin; Rains County Judge, Mr. Wayne Wolfe; and Ms. Keeley Roan herself. Mr. Godwin led us first to The Luckett House. When he opened up the front door and ushered us into the house the feeling of stepping back in the era of 1900’s rushing in. And that was just the start.

See, learn, and experience The Emory Heritage Park yourself through my pictures, presented with some background information. And if you are interested in visiting the park, the next event will be “Back to School Bash”, August 4th, 2012. All buildings / structures will be opened for public.

For more information, contact: Ms. Keeley Roan, Director of Community Development of The City of Emory Development Corporation, 903-473-2465 x 112, email: keeley@emorytx.com, website: www.emorytx.com.

Read the article in County Line Magazine‘s August 2012 issue.

Mr. A.B. Godwin & Mrs. Loretta Godwin from Rains County Historical Society, Mr. Wayne Wolfe -Rains County Judge, and Ms. Keeley Roan -Director of Community Development of The City of Emory Development Corporation.

The Gallery View

Battle of the Neches Memorial 33

The Battle of the Neches Memorial 2012

Historic Site, Memorial, Nature, Photography, Redland, Summer, Upper East Texas

Battle of the Neches Memorial Ceremony, July 14th, 2012

Excerpted from “Remembering the Battle of the Neches, Cherokee Chief Bowles, Other Victims” by Shea Gilchrist, published in County Line Magazine, July 2012 issue, page 16:

“… Texas Cherokee and 12 associated tribal bands under the leadership of Chief John ‘Duwa ‘li’ Bowles, Chief Big Mush, and six other tribal chiefs were slain July 16, 1839. The massacre by the Republic of Texas Army, under the direction of President Mirabeau Lamar, took the lives of many innocent men, women, and children along with the burning of a Delaware village. The associated Indian tribal bands were Cherokee, Shawnee, Delaware, Kickapoo, Quapaw, Choctaw, Biloxi, Ioni, Alabama, Coushatta, Caddo of the Neches, Tahocullake, Mataquo and possibly other groups.

In 1936, the State of Texas erected a marker to honor Chief Bowles on the land. It is believed that Bowles died 20 feet in proximity to the marker. When visiting the land, there is a definite feeling of peace, the mystical, and the sacred.

… The most important event they hold on the land each year is the Battle of the Neches memorial ceremony held this year on July 14th.”

The land and historical marker is located at Redland, from Hwy 64 between Edom and Tyler take CR 4923, keep left on a split, keep going and look for the signs “Chief Bowles Memorial”.

Visit their website at www.aics1839.com.

Battle of the Neches Memorial 3

Battle of the Neches Memorial 9

Battle of the Neches Memorial 17

Battle of the Neches Memorial 30

Battle of the Neches Memorial Day 36 - Double Rainbows at the Site 1

Rains County Founder’s Day Festival 2012

Emory, Festivals, Old Downtown, Photography, Summer, Upper East Texas, Way of Life

Rains County Founder’s Day Festival, May 5th, 2012
The festival is celebrating the heritage and pioneer spirit of Rains County. This year’s festival coincides with Cinco de Mayo. This post covers the Founder’s Day Parade in front of Rains County Courthouse, Ford Model A Car Show, Tonantsi Dance by Rains High School Spanish Club, and Radio Control Airplane demonstration.

RainsCo Founders Day | May 2012-20

Tonantsi Dance by Rains High School Spanish Club

Athens Fiddlers Reunion 2012 - 02

Athens Old Fiddlers Reunion 2012

Athens, Black and White, Festivals, Old Downtown, Photography, Spring, Upper East Texas, Way of Life

“East Texas was noted for fiddlers from the time of Sam Houston and Dave Crockett.  Every house raising, log rolling, quilting bee and corn husking was followed by a night of dancing, the square, waltz and the schottische till dawn.  Fiddlers were in demand and plentiful.  Every young swain had to learn to play for the popularity and a small amount of cash.” – Excerpted from Athens Old Fiddlers Reunion’s website.

The 81st edition of Athens Old Fiddlers Reunion was held on May 25th, 2012. It took place all day at Henderson County Courthouse yard in downtown Athens. A fairground was also set up across the courthouse.

Athens Fiddlers Reunion 2012 - 02

Athens Fiddlers Reunion 2012 - 04

Athens Fiddlers Reunion 2012 - 08

Athens Fiddlers Reunion 2012 - 19

Athens Fiddlers Reunion 2012 - 25

Ms. Pearl Cantrell, playing her ukulele, accompanied by daughter, Malia Cantrell, from Seven Points, Tx. Ms. Pearl Cantrell has brought Hawaiian music programs as a visiting instructor to Kemp Primary students two years in a row.

Van Zandt County Balloon Festival

Canton, Edgewood, Festivals, Photography, Skyscape, Spring, Upper East Texas

Van Zandt County Balloon Festival was held last weekend (May 19th, 2012) at Tailwind Airpark in Canton, Texas. About a dozen hot-air balloons participated and specked the sky over Canton with colorful bubbles early Saturday, and also Sunday, morning. Airplane flying demonstrations entertained the crowds during the day until it’s time for balloon glows near sunset. Everybody seemed to have tons of fun in this event. The sight of giant glowing bubbles and the sound of hot air being blown into the balloons, plus children screaming of excitement, left me with happy feeling. I am looking forward to next year’s Van Zandt County Balloon Festival!