Back to Fort Worth

Architecture, Beyond, Dallas, Museum, Photography, Travel, Winter

Fort Worth in late December.

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Fort Worth water garden plaza

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A sock left behind by the aerating pond at the Fort Worth Water Garden

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Sundance Square

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Sundance Square

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Fort Worth skyline viewed from the Amon Carter Museum of American Art

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A corner of the Amon Carter Museum building

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Fort Worth skyline viewed from inside the museum

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Music from the border. A movie presentation of Border Cantos exhibition

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An exhibit, spectator, and museum guide

© Ine Burke | Inegaleri.com

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Food Vendors – A handmade book

Beyond, Fine art photography, Photography, Portrait, Travel

A photo essay consisting five portraits of food vendors from various cities in Indonesia:

  • Soybean curd dessert vendor on the street of North Bandung
  • Crackers vendor in her traditional kitchen in East Bandung
  • Chinese-style roast pork belly vendor in Belitung Island
  • Gudeg (traditional cuisine of Central Java) booth worker in Yogyakarta
  • Noodle vendor in front of her booth in East Bandung

Book dimension 7″ x 10″ (closed) / 8 leaves of 7″ (opened), printed on premium archival fine art 300 gsm paper, digital inkjet printing, custom made red linen hardcover.

Available for pre-order. Email to inegaleri@gmail.com.

See The Making of My Handmade Photobooks.

The Making of My Handmade Photobooks

Beyond, Fine art photography, Photography, Travel

This year, I introduced my first handmade photobooks to the 40th Edgewood Heritage Festival and 211 Art Gallery “Around the World” show, both were held on November 12th, 2016.

An accordion photobook that consists of 5 to 7 photos is a perfect medium to present a short photo essay.  It also serves as a nice display piece that can be stored like a book. After many researches on materials and how-tos, and a visit to Book Doctor in Dallas, Tx., to get materials for book cover, I went ahead with the production. I made two photobooks, “North Shore of Belitung Island” and “Food Vendors”, which photos were taken during a trip back home to Indonesia this summer.

“North Shore of Belitung Island” consists of 7 landscape photographs which leads to the decision to make a “landscape” orientation book (finished book dimension with cover is 10″ width x 7″ height). The “Food Vendors” exhibits 5 photographs of people in small food businesses in “portrait” orientation, thus the book orientation (finished book dimension with cover is 7″ width x 10″ height). They are now displayed at the 211 Art Gallery in Athens, Tx., and available for pre-order (email to inegaleri@gmail.com).

Here’s the steps I went through to produce my first handmade photobooks:

1. Print the content on 13″x19″ premium archival fine art and photographic digital paper.

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2. Cut paper according to design dimension. What I have here are 19″ x 6.5″ pieces for the Belitung Island and 13″ x 9.5″ pieces for Food Vendors book.

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3. Score the paper with bone folder accordingly to create a crease for neater and easier folding.

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4. Make hinges to connect the papers with glue to create the accordion effect.  Use pH neutral glue made for book binding and paper projects.

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The accordion book formed.

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5. Cut board and linen for the book covers. The board’s dimension is 0.5 inches bigger that the book’s width and height, the linen’s is slightly bigger than the board. Wrap and glue the linen to the boards.

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6. Glue the content to the covers.

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7. The finished accordion books.

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© Ine Burke | inegaleri.com

Spring in Van Zandt County, Texas

Canton, Countryscape, Edgewood, Fruitvale, Grand Saline, Heritage Park, Nature, Redland, Spring, Travel, Upper East Texas, Wills Point

Spring sightings from various places in Van Zandt County, Texas – March/April 2016

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Pear blossom and contented cows – Edgewood, Tx

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A bird perching on a blossoming sassafras tree – Edgewood, Tx

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Red bud trees by the railway – Fruitvale, Tx

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Grand Saline Library – Grand Saline, Tx

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Peach blossoms at a Peach Farm and Old Fashioned Ice Cream – Hwy 19, Edgewood, Tx

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Hickenbach Texas a.k.a Jones Junction – US 80 & TX 19, Edgewood, Tx

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Scott Cabin at the Heritage Park Museum of East Texas – Edgewood, Tx

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A field of purple and gold by Side Pea Farm – Canton, Tx

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Blooming azaleas – Canton, Tx

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Canton Lake – Canton, Tx

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Picnic Area on Hwy 64 – Canton, Tx

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Indian Paintbrush and Crimson Clover on Hwy 64 – Redland, Tx

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Crimson Clover – Redland, Tx

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Indian paintbrush across the Tawakoni Spillway – Wills Point, Tx

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Tawakoni Spillway Levee – Wills Point, Tx

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Roses by the 1848 Will’s Cabin – Wills Point, Tx

All rights reserved © Ine Burke | inegaleri.com

The Best Kept Secret of East Texas

Beyond, Historic Parkway, Nature, Photography, Spring, Travel, Upper East Texas
Mrs. Lee’s Daffodil Garden

Around 1954, over 1,000 acres of land near Gladewater, Texas, was transformed by the land lady, Mrs. Helen Lee, into a secret garden.  Out of her love to the land, she converted what used to be a gravel pits into a daffodil retreat with a 5-acre lake and a 3-acre pond, called Lake Josephine – named after her mother.  It took an entire boxcar load of daffodil bulbs from Holland and about 40 workers to make this daffodil garden.  It is considered the best kept secret in East Texas.  A replica of pioneer style log cabin was added to the site in 1954 overlooking Lake Josephine as a quiet place to enjoy the beauty of the land and its wildlife. Following her passing in 1984, at her request, the park has been opened to the public in spring.

Learn more about the park at http://www.daffodilgarden.com/daffodils_home.htm

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Lake Josephine and Log Cabin Site

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Photographs © Ine Burke | inegaleri.com

St. Louis Cemetery No. 1, New Orleans

Architecture, Beyond, Beyond Upper East Texas, Black and White, Fine art photography, Photography, Travel

This is one out of three St. Louis Cemeteries, the oldest surviving cemeteries in New Orleans.  It was established by Royal Spanish Land Grant in 1789.  The St. Louis Cemetery No.1, at the corner of St. Louis and Basin Street, was originally twice its current size and located outside of the city limit. All the graves are above-ground vaults which believed to protect the bodies from flooding and was also a common practice adapted by French and Spanish culture.

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The sky-scraping New Orleans city skyline against down-to-earth tombs of St. Louis Cemetery No.1.

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The cemetery is adorned with fascinating memorial sculptures, monuments, and statuary.Ine Burke | St Louis Cemetery-1

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The tallest monument in the cemetery belongs to The Italian Mutual Benevolent Society.  The tomb has space for a thousand remains for the society members.  It is a way to lower the fund of burial for individuals.

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Some of notable citizens of New Orleans were buried here.  The most visited now is probably what is believed to be the tomb of the Voo Doo Queen, Marie Laveau, who was rested in her family tomb.  The tomb is covered with cross marks put by people who believe that it will make Laveau’s spirit grant a wish. The living family members consider this as vandalism.

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“OMNIA AB UNO” – all comes from One-  is engraved on this pure white 9-feet pyramid tomb belongs to actor Nicolas Cage for his future final resting place. The plot was purchased in 2010.

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The Adams Family tomb (the white one).

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A tomb with different finish.

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Iron works at the cemetery adapt fleur-de-lis and cross elements.

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New Orleans skyline meets the cemetery’s gate.Ine Burke | St Louis Cemetery-16Photographs © 2015 Ine Burke | inegaleri.com

All photograph is available for individual print purchase.

The Streets of French Quarter, New Orleans – Part 1

Architecture, Beyond, Beyond Upper East Texas, Black and White, Photography, Travel

Who doesn’t need a vacation.  A recent trip to the French Quarter, New Orleans, satisfied my ‘appetite’ for street and people photography.

Ine Burke - NOLA PPL-1 Napoleon Building, Chartres and St. Louis St.

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Ine Burke - NOLA PPL-2 B is for “beignet” – Cafe Du Monde, Decatur and St. Ann St.

~Ine Burke - NOLA PPL-3The gate to historic French Market, Ursuline Ave. and N. Peter St.
~Ine Burke - NOLA PPL-4 Between the first and second section of the French Market, a stall keeper blends in with an art installation.

~Ine Burke - NOLA PPL-5“$ Starting artist trying to pace along $” the sign says – Somewhere in French Quarter

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Is it Johny Depp? – Somewhere in French Quarter

~Ine Burke - NOLA PPL-7Royal St.

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Photographs © 2015 Ine Burke | inegaleri.com

38th Annual Edgewood Heritage Festival’s Artwork

Edgewood, Festivals, Heritage Park, My Graphic Work, MySpread, Travel, Upper East Texas

Once again, I had the honor to do the branding for the 38th Annual Edgewood Heritage Festival, in Edgewood, Tx.  From Facebook cover page, rack card, window flyer, print and electronic advertisement for several publications, to t-shirt and poster. The Blacksmith Shop was chosen as the annual collectible ornament so it is used in the artworks.

 

To see last year’s visual identity, go to: https://inegaleri.com/2013/08/23/37th-edgewood-heritage-festival-van-zandt-county-texas/

Ben Wheeler Feral Hog Festival 2014

Ben Wheeler, Fall, Festivals, Old Downtown, Photography, Travel, Upper East Texas

Photos from the annual Ben Wheeler Feral Hog Festival 2014, October 25th, featuring the Hog Parade, Willie Peden Syrup Mill, and Moore’s Store at Ben Wheeler, Texas.

Photographs ©2014 Ine Burke

Marshall Wonderland of Lights

Architecture, Festivals, Historic Site, Main Street City Texas, Marshall, Old Downtown, Photography, Texas, Travel, Upper East Texas, Winter

light  |līt|
noun
1| the natural agent that stimulates sight and makes things visible

2| an area of something that is brighter or paler than its surroundings

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This is my take on the Marshall Wonderland of Lights Festival, in Marshall, Texas, December 2013.

Marshall Wonderland of Lights

The Historic Harrison County Courthouse, Texas, the center stage of the festival.

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The Courthouse 2

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The Courthouse 3 – taken from the Horse Carriage Ride, from southwest of the Peter Whetstone Square

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The Courthouse viewed from around Peter Whetstone Square – 1

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The Courthouse viewed from around Peter Whetstone Square – 2

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The Courthouse viewed from around Peter Whetstone Square – 3

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Marshall Wonderland of Lights

The Courthouse viewed from around Peter Whetstone Square – 4

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Marshall Wonderland of Lights

The Horse Carriage Ride along North Washington Avenue

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Marshall Wonderland of Lights

The Courthouse viewed from North Washington Avenue and East Austin Street – 1

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Marshall Wonderland of Lights

The Courthouse viewed from North Washington Avenue and East Austin Street – 2

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Marshall Wonderland of Lights

Lights from vendor and ticket booths opposite the Telegraph Park -1

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Marshall Wonderland of Lights

Lights from vendor and ticket booths opposite the Telegraph Park -2

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© Ine Burke 2014

Link to Marshall Wonderland of Lights Festival.

Discover 300 Years of History in 35 Miles in Van Zandt County, Texas

Edgewood, Fruitvale, Grand Saline, Historic Parkway, Historic Site, MySpread, Texas, Travel, Upper East Texas, Wills Point

SELF-GUIDED TOUR OF THE DALLAS-SHREVEPORT HISTORIC PARKWAY IN VAN ZANDT COUNTY

BY INE BURKE for the County Line Magazine October 2012

The early native American Caddo established a trail from the Red River in Louisiana, as far west as the Pecos River to trade with the Jumano who inhabited West Texas. The trail later evolved into main route from the river port in Shreveport to North Texas. Now, historical societies in North Texas are working to research and preserve this historic road. In Van Zandt County, the work has been done by The Old Dallas – Shreveport Preservation Association, established in 1993, whose committees are also members of the county historical societies. Being the most advanced in the effort among other counties, the committee has put up road signs and historical markers along the path, enabling people to do a self-guided tour and discover at least 300 years of history along the 35-mile section of this county’s historical route.

The Old Dallas-Shreveport Road’s existence shaped the towns and communities in northeast Texas. The Texas and Pacific Railway was laid parallel to the Old Dallas-Shreveport Road about a mile northward in 1873. US Highway 80 was established later. It is also laid parallel to the historic road and was initially known as the “Dixie Overland Trail” in 1914. Its name became TX15 in 1919 and later US80 in 1926. The arrival of the railway and US80 ended the era of the Old Dallas-Shreveport Road as a major thoroughfare. See the history timeline of the old road at the end of this article.

THE TOUR

The Dallas-Shreveport Road Historic Parkway, Van Zandt County, Tx

Dallas-Shreveport Historic Parkway in Van Zandt County, Texas

Tour this historical parkway eastward point by point from Wills Point to Sand Flat in Van Zandt County, Texas.

1. The tour starts at the junction of HWY64 and CR3415 in Wills Point, just south of US80. The founders of Wills Point first settled here in 1847 and the County Seat War took place in 1877 along this part of the Dallas-Shreveport Road.

2. About 4 miles from Point 1 – New Hope Cemetery. A veteran of the Texas war for independence from Mexico, set aside some acres to encourage settlement around 1871. He and four confederate soldiers are among those who were buried here.

3. FM1504 and CR3215. A cotton gin is believed to have been located near this crossroads. About 450 yards from the intersection, where the road bends right, a freight company stop used to operate in the mid 1800’s.

4. From CR3215 to CR3216, 300 yards on left. Slaughter School, built in 1888, fulfilled the need for a school due to the population growth along the road. It was later consolidated with the Edgewood school district. Go back to CR3215.

5. Barren Ridge. Continue to CR3218, cross FM859 to CR3118, turn right to CR3105, pass CR3109. This is where the Black Land Prairie meets the Post Oak Savannah, thus name ‘Edgewood’. Barren Ridge used to be a savannah. The cultivation brought by the settlers is the reason why the trees are there now. A post office and stage stop was once located here from 1850 to 1857. The citizens of Canton once traveled 8 miles here for their mail.

Crooked Creek, Van Zandt County, Tx

Between Point 5-6: Crooked Creek, Van Zandt County, Tx

Between 5-6. Continue through a grove where the canopy of trees thickens. Sunken trails on either side of the road were the original Dallas-Shreveport road bed. From an unguarded wooden bridge, the steep Crooked Creek’s bank is noticeable. Where the road bends right, the original trail bends away into private lands towards Point 7.

6. A mile from the bridge, stands a tree that grows almost in the middle of the road. Back in the 1800’s, surveyors often used a tree on the land they surveyed as the benchmark, and called this tree the witness tree. This is one of them.

7. To TX19 and go north. The location of Point 7 is on private property, approximately across CR3108, on right. It’s a crossing with deep vertical banks near Mill Creek, and is part of the old Caddo trail. The early pioneers who traveled this road called it Devil’s Gap due to raids by Kiowa and other native American tribes who used this part of the trail as an attack point. Stop at the Mill Creek bridge (past Point 8), to visualize the condition.

8. From TX19 turn right to CR1117. About 0.5 miles down the road, on the left across from a private mailbox, there’s a steel sign post, where Father Jose Calahorra Historical Marker once was. The marker was stolen after its dedication in 2009. It is such a shame, considering that it’s the oldest historical facts found so far related to this part of the road. This is where the Caddo trail intersected Tawakoni trail that went from the Sabine River in the north to Nacogdoches in the south. The entourage of Father Jose Calahorra, a well-respected Spanish missionary in Texas, was greeted here and then escorted by the Tawakoni to their village on the Sabine River in 1760, 1761, and 1764.

9. Cherokee Survey Line, dated 1841, crosses the CR1117 1 mile down the road from Point 8.

10. About 4.5 miles from Point 8, on CR1817, on left. An effort to colonize an area of North Central Texas and settle 500 families in 5 years was led by Charles Mercer in 1844. The boundaries were Palestine and Waco on the south, the Brazos River on the west, McKinney area on the north, and this point on the east. Descendants of Mercer’s colony settlers still reside in Texas.

Point 8: Father Jose Calahorra Historical Marker Dedication

Point 8: Father Jose Calahorra Historical Marker Dedication

11. Turn right to CR1818. The marker is in the Creagleville Cemetery. The Dallas-Shreveport Road went through Creagleville, a community named after Henry Creagle, a German native who settled in Van Zandt County in 1847.The agricultural community once had a school, church, cotton gin, gristmill, and cemetery. Only the cemetery remains today.

12. Straight ahead to CR1820, to the intersection with CR1824, on left. During the Civil War, people from the southeast fled west and formed a community here around 1863, on land where the property owners were away at war. Poles were used to build homes, thus Poletown. After the war, arrangements were made for them to purchase land or become tenant farmers. Jacob C. Rhodes’ land in Poletown was designated as a new town, Rhodesburg, in 1895. Rhodes was a member of the Populist Party, who then changed to and organized the Socialist Party of Texas. For over a decade the town accommodated the Socialist Party’s movement.

13. Continue to CR1823/W Patterson St. Take a glance at Morton Salt Company Lake, on right, a private man-made lake built by B.W. Carrington & Company in 1911 for the salt plant use.

14. Continue east on Hwy17 to the meeting point with Hwy110. The original road goes straight through private lands and picks up again at Point 18.Take left on Hwy110/FM17.  An old cotton gin sits on the left. Continue through historic downtown Grand Saline to the intersection with US80.

15. Across the junction of Hwy110/FM17 and US80, on left – The Salt Palace is a tiny building made of pure salt that has been rebuilt three times since its debut in 1936 due to deterioration caused by weather. Inside, it exhibits the salt industry and history of Grand Saline. Wiley H. Post, one of world’s greatest pioneer aviators who is a native son of Van Zandt County, is also remembered here.

Point 14: 1890 Coton Gin, Grand Saline, Tx

Point 14: 1890 Coton Gin, Grand Saline, Tx

16. Continue 0.5 mile east on US80, take right to FM857. Kleer Park is located on the left. During the Civil War, the demand for salt increased significantly to preserve food and hides. Salt workers were exempted from army service. The salt mine in Grand Saline was once named Kleer Mine. It was operated by the Confederacy during the war.

17. Salt Flat, Marsh, and Birds Sanctuary on FM857, by the first concrete bridge. Take a peek at the white surface of one of the largest and purest salt domes in the country. Its depth is unknown and its supply of the valuable mineral is estimated to last 20,000 years. The Cherokee were the first to obtain salt from here in the early 1800’s. It is now designated as a bird sanctuary.

18. Jordan’s Saline and the site of the first courthouse, by the second bridge, across CR1701. It’s the oldest community in Van Zandt County, established by John Jordan in 1844, even before the county was formed in 1848. It was once the County Seat before being moved to Canton in 1850. By 1860 it had a thriving salt industry. The community diminished after the railroad arrived in 1873 and the townsite was relocated one mile north and named Grand Saline.

19. Continue 2.8 miles, to the junction of FM1255 (Crockett’s Bluff Road) and FM857, on Sand Flat Cemetery property. It’s a small community that sprung up along the historic road in the 1850’s. It was first known as Chrestman, then Sand Flat, and later “Fulton” when a post office was in operation from 1900-1905. The community retained the name Sand Flat.

20. Continue on FM 857 to Providence, another community that grew along the road in the 1850’s. It’s the eastern end of the historic parkway in Van Zandt County. Providence Cemetery, established in 1873, is just past the Smith County line. Spanish explorer, Pedro Vial may have used part of this road in 1788. End of the tour. Continue to the intersection with FM1253, go north 3.4 miles to get to US80.

Beyond Van Zandt County to the east, the route resumes about 3.5 miles south on FM1253 from Providence, take CR452 on left. From Wills Point to the west, the route goes northwest towards Rockwall, then to downtown Dallas (Bird’s Fort by Trinity River) – also recognized as the historical Central National Road of the Republic of Texas; then to Arlington and end at Fort Worth. Dallas was actually built on the old Caddo trade trail. ~

The article was published in the County Line Magazine: http://www.countylinemagazine.com/October-2012/Discover-300/

History Timeline of the Dallas - Shreveport Road

History Timeline of the Dallas – Shreveport Road

County Line Magazine on the other Side of the World – by Ine Burke

Beyond, Beyond Upper East Texas, My Graphic Work, MySpread, Travel, Upper East Texas
CLM in INDONESIA 1

County Line Magazine in Indonesia – Page 1/3

CLM in Indonesia 2

County Line Magazine in Indonesia – Page 2/3

County Line Magazine in Indonesia - Page 3/3

County Line Magazine in Indonesia – Page 3/3

Flying Fish Gallery

Ben Wheeler, Old Downtown, Photography, Travel

Flying Fish Gallery, an art gallery nestled in the heart of revitalized old downtown Ben Wheeler, Texas, is operated by husband and wife, Randy and Sherri Martin. The art pieces shown and sold here, are created by artists who lives around the area, including Randy and Sherri’s. Sherri repurposes objects made of metal, wood, or sometimes paper, she found in a flea market, garage sale, or estate sale. She would work with an object by observing it first until she sees a new object comes out of it. Then she would start dismantling, combining, and adding elements to it and go toward where her initial instinct told her to go. For Sherri, animal is the object she loves to make. Randy’s artwork are also shaped by used metal comes from old farm implements or other industrial material. His artworks are displayed outdoor, some mobile, as garden ornaments. Take a peek of Sherri and Randy’s work and gallery through my photos below. The whole art gallery is an art by itself. It’s welcoming, warm, bright, but tranquil at the same time. Sherri Martin was featured in the County Line Magazine in June 2012. Click here to read the coverage. The Flying Fish Gallery is located at downtown Ben Wheeler, along FM279 Artisan Trail, connecting Ben Wheeler and Edom, Texas, off Hwy 64.

I have the honor to be one of the artists whose work is made available for sale through Flying Fish Gallery. My second photography book, My Northeast Texas, is presented beautifully among other local artists’ work in the following photo. The County Line Magazine reviewed the book in March 2013 issue, Artist Publishes Book of Her Northeast Texas Views (Click here to read the review online).

My book displayed with other art pieces and painting in Flying Fish Gallery
The painting is by Anup Bhandari

For more information about my book, go to MY NORTHEAST TEXAS.