The Dancing Trees – A new book by Ine Burke & Harold Burke

Edgewood, My Graphic Work, MySpread, Photography

THE DANCING TREES

Photographs & Words

A new book by Ine Burke & Harold Burke

To be released on November 9th, 2013, at the 37th Edgewood Heritage Festival.

TDT Cover 2013

THE DANCING TREES
Photographs and Words

Photographs by Ine Burke
The Dancing Trees brings together nine photo essays capturing objects normally seen, and some unexpectedly found, in a rural farmstead and in old downtown Edgewood, Texas. It’s simply about the things that we treasure and respect. Care and love. Discover and research. Or just the things that we enjoy doing.

~ Ine Burke

Words by Harold Burke
The words are inspired by Ine’s beautiful photographs, and by our simple life on the farm in East Texas with our wonderful daughter, Alafair. And our dog, Hank.

~ Harold Burke

Book description
Hardbound Case / 8”x10” / 94 Pages / 9 Chapters /
68 Color and Black-and-White Photographs / 22 Poems

November 2013

Edgewood, Texas

Contents
About
List of Photographs and Words
Chapter I: Artifacts
Chapter II: The Barnyard
Chapter III: Edgewood
Chapter IV: The Garden
Chapter V: Horses
Chapter VI: Hunting
Chapter VII: The Dancing Trees
Chapter VIII: Patterns in Nature
Chapter IX: Alafair

Preview

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Follow my Facebook (Inegaleri) for updates.

Advertisements

Northeast Texas Fathers

Family Affair, Photography, Upper East Texas

~ Celebrating fathers of Northeast Texas ~

  Father 2013-1004902

Alba, Texas

Father 2013-1004906

Grand Saline, Texas

Father 2013-1002946

Fruitvale, Texas

Father 2013-1005944

Fruitvale, Texas

AthensFiddlers2013-1006369

Athens, Texas

LIFEFEST-Canton May 2013-0003

Canton, Texas

Photographs © Ine Burke / Inegaleri 2013

A Wedding in Fruitvale, Texas

Black and White, Family Affair, Fruitvale, Photography, Upper East Texas, Way of Life, Wedding

Fruitvale, Texas – Spring 2012

In a little tiny corner of this gargantuan state, the corner some call North Texas, Northeast Texas, East Texas, or Upper East Side of Texas, about a mile east of the intersection between two important highways, US Highway 80 and Texas Highway 19, there’s a tiny city called Fruitvale. It’s an ordinary place, at first sight. Just two highways slicing through small towns, pastures, ranches, quiet communities, bumpy county roads. Trains towing industrial cars. There is no grand canyon or enormous rock monuments. No wide rivers with magnificent old steel bridges. There are no bustling boulevards, nor arrondissement. No modern architectural marvels. No central park dotted with art installations.

It is a community that came into being with the arrival of the Texas and Pacific Railroad in 1873. The town site was initially a railroad switch, which is where the rail track diverges from the main track into a short branch or spur. The switch was called Bolton Switch. One of its early endeavors was cord wood and cross ties, cut from local timber, and used in the construction of the rail lines. In 1903 another industry was thriving and gave the town its current name. About 20,000 fruit trees had been planted and even more in the following years. Berries and other vegetables such as potatos and corn were also blossoming. The local fruit growers filed petition to change the town name to Fruitvale and, obviously, it was granted.

My fellow Texans who live here are very proud of their heritage and celebrate that with a plethora of festivals, parades, rodeos, fairs, barbecues, hoe downs, and other friendly get-to-gathers. When they aren’t having a festival of one kind or another, they are getting together to trade or to swap stuff. They are artists and artisans. They make horseshoes into hat racks. Wine bottles into wind chimes. Oil barrels into barbecue pits. The sheet metal from junked automobiles can become a pink elephant yard ornament or a huge lone star hanging over a gateway to a cattle ranch.

And a life celebration, such as wedding, is observed in an honest, free of pretense, and genuine way of their everyday life.

(Part of the essay was quoted from My Northeast Texas)