The Making of My Handmade Photobooks

Beyond, Fine art photography, Photography, Travel

This year, I introduced my first handmade photobooks to the 40th Edgewood Heritage Festival and 211 Art Gallery “Around the World” show, both were held on November 12th, 2016.

An accordion photobook that consists of 5 to 7 photos is a perfect medium to present a short photo essay.  It also serves as a nice display piece that can be stored like a book. After many researches on materials and how-tos, and a visit to Book Doctor in Dallas, Tx., to get materials for book cover, I went ahead with the production. I made two photobooks, “North Shore of Belitung Island” and “Food Vendors”, which photos were taken during a trip back home to Indonesia this summer.

“North Shore of Belitung Island” consists of 7 landscape photographs which leads to the decision to make a “landscape” orientation book (finished book dimension with cover is 10″ width x 7″ height). The “Food Vendors” exhibits 5 photographs of people in small food businesses in “portrait” orientation, thus the book orientation (finished book dimension with cover is 7″ width x 10″ height). They are now displayed at the 211 Art Gallery in Athens, Tx., and available for pre-order (email to inegaleri@gmail.com).

Here’s the steps I went through to produce my first handmade photobooks:

1. Print the content on 13″x19″ premium archival fine art and photographic digital paper.

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2. Cut paper according to design dimension. What I have here are 19″ x 6.5″ pieces for the Belitung Island and 13″ x 9.5″ pieces for Food Vendors book.

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3. Score the paper with bone folder accordingly to create a crease for neater and easier folding.

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4. Make hinges to connect the papers with glue to create the accordion effect.  Use pH neutral glue made for book binding and paper projects.

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The accordion book formed.

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5. Cut board and linen for the book covers. The board’s dimension is 0.5 inches bigger that the book’s width and height, the linen’s is slightly bigger than the board. Wrap and glue the linen to the boards.

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6. Glue the content to the covers.

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7. The finished accordion books.

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© Ine Burke | inegaleri.com

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A Wedding in Fruitvale, Texas

Black and White, Family Affair, Fruitvale, Photography, Upper East Texas, Way of Life, Wedding

Fruitvale, Texas – Spring 2012

In a little tiny corner of this gargantuan state, the corner some call North Texas, Northeast Texas, East Texas, or Upper East Side of Texas, about a mile east of the intersection between two important highways, US Highway 80 and Texas Highway 19, there’s a tiny city called Fruitvale. It’s an ordinary place, at first sight. Just two highways slicing through small towns, pastures, ranches, quiet communities, bumpy county roads. Trains towing industrial cars. There is no grand canyon or enormous rock monuments. No wide rivers with magnificent old steel bridges. There are no bustling boulevards, nor arrondissement. No modern architectural marvels. No central park dotted with art installations.

It is a community that came into being with the arrival of the Texas and Pacific Railroad in 1873. The town site was initially a railroad switch, which is where the rail track diverges from the main track into a short branch or spur. The switch was called Bolton Switch. One of its early endeavors was cord wood and cross ties, cut from local timber, and used in the construction of the rail lines. In 1903 another industry was thriving and gave the town its current name. About 20,000 fruit trees had been planted and even more in the following years. Berries and other vegetables such as potatos and corn were also blossoming. The local fruit growers filed petition to change the town name to Fruitvale and, obviously, it was granted.

My fellow Texans who live here are very proud of their heritage and celebrate that with a plethora of festivals, parades, rodeos, fairs, barbecues, hoe downs, and other friendly get-to-gathers. When they aren’t having a festival of one kind or another, they are getting together to trade or to swap stuff. They are artists and artisans. They make horseshoes into hat racks. Wine bottles into wind chimes. Oil barrels into barbecue pits. The sheet metal from junked automobiles can become a pink elephant yard ornament or a huge lone star hanging over a gateway to a cattle ranch.

And a life celebration, such as wedding, is observed in an honest, free of pretense, and genuine way of their everyday life.

(Part of the essay was quoted from My Northeast Texas)